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Nikola Dudar: STLCLR - STL Development in the Managed World

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If you write STL code and want take advantage of the BCL while still being able to write STL code, then you're in luck. How so? Well, Nikola Dudar, program manager in the VC++ Libraries Group explains, in detail, the Orcas STLCLR library. We also dig into the evolutionary trajectory of VC++, and discuss some other interesting Orcas C++ libraries. Tune in. Lots of great stuff going on in VC++ World...

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  • Sven GrootSven Groot Don't worry... I'm a doctor.
    I haven't watched the video yet, but this was something I've been thinking about recently (since I've been doing some C++ development lately). Despite the fact that with generics .Net 2.0 offers most of the frequently used STL containers (vector - List<T>, list - LinkedList<T>, stack - Stack<T>, queue - Queue<T>, map - SortedList<TKey, TValue>, hash_map - Dictionary<TKey, TValue>, I can't off-hand think of equivalents for set, multiset, multimap and deque, but I rarely use those), the STL just has a few design advantages over the .Net BCL.

    The biggest example is iteratators and how lovely orthogonal they are. Take <algorithm>; any of those algorithms are applicable to anything that even remotely looks like an iterator. Yet in the managed world, most of those algorithms are class members, and quite often I've found myself needing to sort an IList<T>, which isn't possible directly since Sort is a member of List<T>. If you want to sort e.g. a LinkedList<T> you either need to copy the contents to a List<T> or an array first or roll your own sort. That is not othogonal. A static method somewhere to sort any IList<T> (sorta like Array.Sort, only with ILists instead) would go a long way.
  • For the last several weeks, I have not been able to play the smaller bandwidth-friendly .WMV "Full Screen" version.  The Download version works fine.  I get the following error -

    Windows Media Player encountered a problem while playing the file. For additional assistance, click Web Help.

    You've encountered error message C00D11B1 while using Windows Media Player. The following information might help you troubleshoot the issue.

    This error might have been triggered by an error in another program or component of Windows. The following information describes the original error.

    Original Error Code: C00D002B
     Original Error Message:  The request is invalid in the current state.
     


    XP SP2, WMP 11

    Is it just me?

    Am I high on crack?

  • Does anyone know if managed C++ is being used in any production products?

    Microsoft seems to be all but ignoring unmanaged development now, continually pounding out this "managed managed managed" mantra for C++.  But I've yet to encounter anything but unmanaged in the wild, so I would be interested to see what managed is being used for.

  • CharlesCharles Welcome Change
    PhrostByte wrote:
    

    Does anyone know if managed C++ is being used in any production products?

    Microsoft seems to be all but ignoring unmanaged development now, continually pounding out this "managed managed managed" mantra for C++.  But I've yet to encounter anything but unmanaged in the wild, so I would be interested to see what managed is being used for.



    What gives you this impression? C++ CLI is mostly used for interop between C++ and managed. It's a great (and natural) way to .NET enable unmanaged applications... So, consider the case when you want to interop with .NET from MFC, for example. We will be releasing a video on Channel 9 that provides an example of exactly this in, yes, a shipping MS product...
    C
  • right, the video you mentioned is the (second!) best video on channel9. made me really happy to hear that the focus on native c++ will increase over the next few months/years.

    dont forget: the best video on channel9 is still the hike with Bill Hill!

    i'm really looking forward to watching the video on native/managed integration in a shipping product. i suppose visual studio itself might be the product with the most interop going on....
  • PhrostByte wrote:
    

    Does anyone know if managed C++ is being used in any production products?

    Microsoft seems to be all but ignoring unmanaged development now, continually pounding out this "managed managed managed" mantra for C++.  But I've yet to encounter anything but unmanaged in the wild, so I would be interested to see what managed is being used for.





    I usually do not login to reply to this board, but I had to this time.  (BTW I LOVE CHANNEL 9, I watch it everyday while I code in my igloo (I live in Toronto, Canada)).

    I use Managed C++ in some of my applications that is part of  a production system.  The code is part of a communications application (cant tell ya more than that) that is originally written in UnManaged C++ ( I wont use the word legacy).   I like the mix of unmanged C++ and managed C++ together.  For me, I will code in the right language/framework to completed the solution.

    ^ So do not be scared to try out a Managed / Unmanaged C++ combo together !

    If you watch all the VC++ videos here on channel 9, you would know that Microsoft is not  pushing "managed managed managed".  I suggest you watch the video:

    BEST Channel 9 video on the server

    BTW, can we have more VC++ interviews Smiley [6]

    note: I just finished my morning coffee so I maybe no a sugar high for the next 20 minutes Tongue Out
  • jjones -

    You're high! Smiley

    Works fine here - XP SP2 & WMP 11

     

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