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Windows 7 Taskbar in 10 Minutes -- Part III: Jumplists

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This is the third part of my ScreenCast series on implementing the Windows 7 Taskbar features in less than 10 minutes Smiley (well I ran little over this time Wink, sorry). The short video shows how to leverage the Windows 7 JumpList feature for your application.

You can find the screencast @

Part III -- JumpList:
In this part I show you how to develop an application that

  1. Creates a custom category for the Jumplist.
  2. Allows you to add Items to the custom Jumplist category (in this case text files, opened in Notepad when selected).
  3. Add user tasks to the Jumplist such as opening the calculator or notepad when selected.
  4. Add a separator to the Jumplist to group items.

http://channel9.msdn.com/posts/GLenz/Windows-7-Taskbar-in-10-Minutes-Part-III-Jumplists/ . The source code is available here.

The other parts of the screencast series can be viewed @
Part II -- Icon Overlay:
In this part I show you how to implement custom Icon Overlays in the taskbar indicating the happiness (happy/unhappy) of your application. In your applications you can use this to

  1. Can indicate the status of your application or provide other useful information (such as online/offline, sign in status, status of your application).
  2. Dynamically change the icon.

http://channel9.msdn.com/posts/GLenz/Windows-7-Taskbar-in-10-Minutes-Part-II-Icon-Overlay/The source code is available here.

Part I -- ProgressBar and Status:
In the first part of my screencast series I develop an application that allows to

  1. Show the progress of the applications work in the taskbar.
  2. Indicate the status (Paused, Normal, No determinate, Error).
  3. Dynamically change the status based on events.

http://channel9.msdn.com/posts/GLenz/Windows-7-Taskbar-in-10-Minutes-Part-I-Progress-Bar/ . The source code is available here .

Part IV -- Preview and Window Peek:  
In the last part of the screencast series I show you how to develop an application that

  1. Allows you to show a clipped Taskbar Preview of your application, on a defined location of your application window.
  2. Dynamically changes the size of the preview image in the Taskbar.
  3. Change the preview image to show a custom Icon instead.
  4. Show a custom Window Peek Bitmap of your application when hovering with the mouse over the Taskbar Preview.

http://channel9.msdn.com/posts/GLenz/Windows-7-Taskbar-in-10-Minutes-Part-IV-Preview-and-Peek/
The source code is available here.
You can download the managed wrappers for the Windows 7 API from the Vista Bridge web page.

The Windows API Code Pack can be downloaded here.

I hope you found the series of Screencasts useful and to the point Smiley.

Also, check out my blog at http://blogs.msdn.com/glenz .

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  • Hey Gunther,

    I found this to be a pretty cool presentation. I have soem feedback for future posts which I hope will be helpful.

    You fisrt explained what the application was supposed to do at the 5 minute mark. I think a brief overview of the capabilities sought at the begining would be more likely to get people staying through the end.

    You might even consider showing the finished product at the begining just so people know what you are trying to accomplish. Secondly, you might jump direct to the code that matters such as the form and programing the jumplist. Third for those who are interested, you could do the house keeping parts like the using and variable setup. For me this would have made the presentation more impactful.

    Thanks for showing of the features of the API.

    Jeff

  • Gunther LenzGLenz DunPanic

    Jeff,

    thanks for the ver good suggestions.... I will definetly incorporate them in my next screencasts Smiley. For this series I really wanted to keep it short, and show all the steps (which might be overkill indeed, as you correctly pointed out Smiley but I was hoping it would be useful for people not aware of the Vista Bridge and the Windows API Code Pack ....). Therefore, I didn't include a walkthrough of the application at the beginning.

    In addition, as a compromise I added a description of what I want to accomplish in teh descriptions part of the screencast series. This should help to set the context. Unfortunately, I was not able to add screenshots of the application to the description, otherwise I would have added them to show the results, but they are on my blog. They show the result of the application we are writing.

    Again thanks for hints on how I can improve the next screencasts, I will include them in my next screencasts  Smiley

     

    Gunther

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