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Kevin Schofield - Inside Microsoft Research

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Kevin Schofield, general manager at Microsoft Research, has a unique job. He's responsible for helping move technologies out of Microsoft Research and into Microsoft's products.

Recently he invited Channel 9 to come over for a chat and a tour around to meet some interesting people inside Microsoft Research.

Over the next week you'll see the tour -- some really interesting people work at Microsoft, including the inventor of the laser printer.

Anyway, here's the interview with Kevin. If you want to hear more from Kevin, check out his weblog.

By the way, did you know that Research now is publishing RSS feeds so you can always be up to date on the latest that they are working on?

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  • pacelvipacelvi Phear
    This was interesting to watch and actually got very interesting right when it ended.  It's probably the longest video I've seen here.  Not a complaint.

    Thanks.
  • scobleizerscobleizer I'm the video guy
    Thanks, I think the really good stuff from this interview is yet to come! Smiley
  • Adam KinneyAdamKinney Agent of Change
    This is great, I love the new "conversational" approach that MS Research is taking.  Thanks a lot for the video.

    SUBSCRIBED  (to all 3 feeds)
  • ArSaArSa HAL 9000
    the voice level in this video and in general audio quality is pretty low for ammount of talking this guy does Smiley
    pretty interesting, only if i could hear it well...
  • This video was very interesting, it would be interesting to see some interviews for some of the other MS Research teams are working on

  • The Channel 9 Team wrote:
    ...some really interesting people work at Microsoft, including the inventor of the laser printer.


    Side question: in order to get a job in Microsoft Research do you have to have a PhD or be the inventor of something like a laser printer?  Just curious as to what the "bar" was set at for entry in that area.  Great video, by the way...hope to see more soon.
  • scobleizerscobleizer I'm the video guy
    ArSa: hmmm, sorry about the audio level. On my system I can turn up my speaker volume and hear it just fine. You might want to get a pair of powered speakers so you can adjust the volume up a bit.
  • The Channel 9 TeamThe Channel 9 Team 5 guys from Redmond
    Mazric: more interviews coming soon. I spent a bit of time with research. Second part of the tour comes up today -- a look at the University Relations group.
  • jsrfc58 wrote:

    ... in order to get a job in Microsoft Research do you have to have a PhD or be the inventor of something like a laser printer?  Just curious as to what the "bar" was set at for entry in that area.


    In general, you do indeed need to have a PhD or distinguished yourself in a research area. Lesser-qualified people can work in MSR, but they tend to be supporting developers, equivalent to grad students in academia. That's not to say that the RSDE's (Research Software Development Engineers) don't do any research -- they actually do get support for writing papers and so forth -- but they fill more of a supporting role in the research organization.
  • .

  • ArSaArSa HAL 9000
    it's fine, i have headphones and can hear well if i turn everything up. thank you Smiley
  • Chris PietschmannCRPietschma​nn Chris Pietschmann
    Can you really store a video recording of your entire life in a pedabyte? That is alot of video!! You wouldn't really need to remember things if you had that. You could literally search through your memories. That is really kind of scary if you think about it.
  • The problem is not the recording or storing of a video of an entire life, but how one would go about searching it. Neither voice nor video recognition is anywhere close to being able to offer a solution to this and that is not going to change in the foreseeable future.

    In practice we will soon have the technology that will provide functionality analogous to a (digital)vcr with one long program of your life. You will be able to replay the events of a particular time but not much else. I expect it will be a pretty boring program to boot.


    Bob

  • Jim Gray is my source -- he was the one who told me that it takes a petabyte of storage. He is generally a source I would trust. Smiley
  • How about this calculation?

    An average life has:

    80 years * 365.25 days * 24 hours * 60 mins * 60 sec = 2,524,608,000 seconds


    Recording at a reasonable quality:

    @300K per sec = 757,382,400,000,000 bytes = 0.75 pedabytes

     

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