Entries:
Comments:
Posts:

Loading User Information from Channel 9

Something went wrong getting user information from Channel 9

Latest Achievement:

Loading User Information from MSDN

Something went wrong getting user information from MSDN

Visual Studio Achievements

Latest Achievement:

Loading Visual Studio Achievements

Something went wrong getting the Visual Studio Achievements

New Features In Windows 7

The wait is up! Today at PDC, we finally got to see a demo of the next OS from Microsoft: Windows 7. One of the biggest improvements in Windows 7 is the new taskbar, but there have also been other improvements like better networking features and a less noisy UAC. If you're just looking for Windows 7 screenshots, then click here. For more details on the features themselves, keep reading.

The Windows 7 UI:

  • The new taskbar: the quick launch area is gone. Now there’s just the taskbar. Application icons can be “docked” in this taskbar. You can drag-and-drop application icons to this area for one-click access but running apps will appear here as well.

2980941543_67e17206bb_o

  • “Jump Lists” is a new feature that groups related tasks surrounding an application. In the taskbar, a right-click (or finger swipe if using touch) to display this list. Here, you’ll find common tasks, recently opened files, favorites, or whatever else may be relevant to that particular app.

2980941399_eebbb64694_o

  • Jump lists are found in the Start Menu, too.

2980939913_705f4162b9_o

  • “Snap to docking”: You know how you have to manually resize windows when you want to compare two windows side-by-side? No more. This new feature will automatically resize the windows for you as you drag them to the sides of your screen.
  • You can maximize a window by dragging the title bar to the top of the screen, too.
  • Your Windows Sidebar Gadgets can now be placed anywhere, not just on the sidebar – you can do this now, but the sidebar takes up real estate when it’s running. Now there are just Desktop Gadgets…no more sidebar

2980939565_fde82da1f9_o 

  • “Peeking” at windows is a new feature that lets you quickly glance at a different window that the one you’re in but not actually interact with it. When you “peek” at a window you can turn the other windows to glass to make it easier to see the window you’re viewing.

2981796890_c9cde25afa_o

  • You can peek at the desktop, too.

2981796816_7cf32f355d_o 

Networking:

  • Wi-Fi Networking Improvements: When wi-fi is available, the wireless icon lights up in the system tray. Click it to display a pop-up list of wireless networks then click the one you want to connect to. If you have to enter a passphrase, you’ll be prompted to do so, otherwise, you’re connected immediately.

2981796690_62a4852fec_o 

  • When connected to a network, you’ll have access to the “Homegroup” directory interface. From here, you have access  to all devices in your home including PCs, laptops, mobile phones, digital photo frames, printers, etc.  Sharing features for the home network have also been simplified. 
  • When you bring a work laptop home, it automatically connects to your home network even though it’s configured to connect to a domain. It also protects your work files even though you’re on your home network.
  • Windows 7 switches your default printer depending on where you are – work or home, etc.
  • “Libraries” are a new feature that group similar items across the various drives of your PC (HDD, external HDD, USB flash drives) as well as across your network. It integrates the Windows Search functionality to make finding files across your network easier, too.

2981796392_07268fbf33_o

Media & Themes:

  • The new lightweight version of Windows MediaPlayer lets you play media from any device in your “Homegroup”.  You can play audio, pictures, or videos across the network. 

2980940015_c733872f74_o

  • Media Center gets some interface tweaks including a new visual style for the newly customizable main menu.
  • Themes, themes: You can customize your desktop background and see a live preview when doing so before making the change. 

2981797256_b27f8f42db_o

System Stuff:

  • UAC is less annoying! UAC was created with the “best of intentions” they said during the demo, but it was a little too intrusive. Now there’s a new slider control that lets you adjust how much the UAC pop-up is allowed to bug you. You can also adjust warning levels specifically to disable warnings for things like changing Windows settings while still getting warned with 3rd party programs try to make unauthorized changes. Adjusting the UAC settings no longer requires a reboot, either.
  • The new “Action Center” lets you control the messages delivered through things like Windows Firewall, Windows Updates, etc.
  • Touch support: On touch-enabled devices, you can interact with the OS via touch, gestures, flicks, etc. Windows 7 supports multi-touch. There’s also around 25% more space between items in the context menus to allow easier control when touching.
  • System Tray: In Windows 7, you have complete control over your system tray. You can remove, change, and even move around the different applications that reside there.
  • DirectX is extended to 2D, animation and “fine-looking” text.
  • Windows 7 has a reduced memory footprint and they’ve reduced the disk I/O reads “substantially.” In the demo, a 1 Ghz/1 GB RAM netbook had 500 MB RAM available after boot.
  • Better power management in Windows 7 means longer battery life for notebooks and netbooks.
  • Overall, the system is faster. The taskbar responds almost instantaneously. The boot time is also faster.
  • You can use BitLocker to encrypt a USB memory stick.
  • Remote Desktop supports multiple monitors. Easier access to VPNs
  • You can both create and boot natively from a Windows 7 VHD.

Misc:

  • A new presentation feature for PowerPoint addicts – Windows Key + P lets you connect to a projector easily.

2981796988_8cc7bf9570_o

  • Yes, Paint got a ribbon.

2980940315_8d35c0fe93_o

Tags:

Follow the Discussion

  • ironbibleironbible

    What is the real difference? i cant really pin point it out besides the task bar and some other small things. is the GUI interface enhanced more and the OS disk space requirements changed? I am curious because i am an IT Assistant and i know that if it is anything like Vista GUI or OS wise then we cant take the risk on putting the OS into out environment and having problems. also how would it work in a VDI environment. i have a close friend that works in a VDI environment and if it would work well then it would be out for him as well. If it has the same problems as Vista i guess our business will have to stick with XP until 2013.

  • ironbibleironbible

    What is the real difference? i cant really pin point it out besides the task bar and some other small things. is the GUI interface enhanced more and the OS disk space requirements changed? I am curious because i am an IT Assistant and i know that if it is anything like Vista GUI or OS wise then we cant take the risk on putting the OS into out environment and having problems. also how would it work in a VDI environment. i have a close friend that works in a VDI environment and if it would work well then it would be out for him as well. If it has the same problems as Vista i guess our business will have to stick with XP until 2013.

  • ironbibleironbible

    What is the real difference? i cant really pin point it out besides the task bar and some other small things. is the GUI interface enhanced more and the OS disk space requirements changed? I am curious because i am an IT Assistant and i know that if it is anything like Vista GUI or OS wise then we cant take the risk on putting the OS into out environment and having problems. also how would it work in a VDI environment. i have a close friend that works in a VDI environment and if it would work well then it would be out for him as well. If it has the same problems as Vista i guess our business will have to stick with XP until 2013.

  • I think the keynote was meant to give us a teaser - but stayed tuned for more technical details in the future. You may also want to keep an eye on Channel 9 and developer blogs as they will likely dive into some of the more technical aspects of Windows 7.

     In the keynote, they did say that -

    # Windows 7 has a reduced memory footprint and they’ve reduced the disk I/O reads “substantially.” In the demo, a 1 Ghz/1 GB RAM netbook had 500 MB RAM available after boot.
    # Better power management in Windows 7 means longer battery life for notebooks and netbooks.

    But that was about as technical as it got...this is more of a "first look."

    You may want to check this out too, a great Q&A on Windows 7: http://www.neowin.net/news/live/08/10/28/live-qa-session-on-windows-7-pdc-build

    Also, Ed Bott's first look: http://blogs.zdnet.com/Bott/?p=575
  • pokeystuffpokeystuff

    I'm really not too sure what you are expecting here from a 1st look.???
    There was enough info here to give people a glimpse of what is to come.. and I don't really understand your comments relating to problems with Vista and therefore possibly Win7. With every new OS comes a transition.. as an IT Pro that change is what keeps us employed and provides our businesses with productiviy benefits, if we didn't have a change well we might as well go back to DOS. I didn't really realise all the great new enhancements in Vista until we started to implement it 6 months after release.. our IT infrastructure has benefited immensely and we will not look back. This will also be the case with Windows 7..

    I'm guessing I'll be still discovering Win7 features when Win8 is released. Microsoft's OSs are very feature rich and there is always too much to cover on a Website like 10.net. Especially considering the OS is not even out yet.

    Cheers.

  • pokeystuffpokeystuff

    I'm really not too sure what you are expecting here from a 1st look.???
    There was enough info here to give people a glimpse of what is to come.. and I don't really understand your comments relating to problems with Vista and therefore possibly Win7. With every new OS comes a transition.. as an IT Pro that change is what keeps us employed and provides our businesses with productiviy benefits, if we didn't have a change well we might as well go back to DOS. I didn't really realise all the great new enhancements in Vista until we started to implement it 6 months after release.. our IT infrastructure has benefited immensely and we will not look back. This will also be the case with Windows 7..

    I'm guessing I'll be still discovering Win7 features when Win8 is released. Microsoft's OSs are very feature rich and there is always too much to cover on a Website like 10.net. Especially considering the OS is not even out yet.

    Cheers.

  • pokeystuffpokeystuff

    I'm really not too sure what you are expecting here from a 1st look.???
    There was enough info here to give people a glimpse of what is to come.. and I don't really understand your comments relating to problems with Vista and therefore possibly Win7. With every new OS comes a transition.. as an IT Pro that change is what keeps us employed and provides our businesses with productiviy benefits, if we didn't have a change well we might as well go back to DOS. I didn't really realise all the great new enhancements in Vista until we started to implement it 6 months after release.. our IT infrastructure has benefited immensely and we will not look back. This will also be the case with Windows 7..

    I'm guessing I'll be still discovering Win7 features when Win8 is released. Microsoft's OSs are very feature rich and there is always too much to cover on a Website like 10.net. Especially considering the OS is not even out yet.

    Cheers.

  • ironbibleironbible

    Our real problem is vendor support. we are a banking/insurance/wealth management corp and we have to be very weiry of anything that we put into place. The security breach on teh Vista was just one of the main cause of pushing away from Vista. Vista is not very beneficial in our environment because we had things we called 'Vista Fits' when we used the computer for more than a solid day and the computer would just go bizerk and we had to reboot. I think that had alot to do with the Memory but still that raises the questions on expenses and computer assests. With the upgrade to Vista alot of out computers have to be upgrade on memory and/or computer. I know alot of people said that they dont have alot of issues with the program. From the time we start Vista in our environment it was a problem. I would really like to dig into windows 7 and see alot of the technical aspects of the OS instead of the 'O look something shiny and pretty' and more on the lines of 'It handled these 4 or 5 programs and it went this many days before the memory really gave us a problem'

  • ironbibleironbible

    Our real problem is vendor support. we are a banking/insurance/wealth management corp and we have to be very weiry of anything that we put into place. The security breach on teh Vista was just one of the main cause of pushing away from Vista. Vista is not very beneficial in our environment because we had things we called 'Vista Fits' when we used the computer for more than a solid day and the computer would just go bizerk and we had to reboot. I think that had alot to do with the Memory but still that raises the questions on expenses and computer assests. With the upgrade to Vista alot of out computers have to be upgrade on memory and/or computer. I know alot of people said that they dont have alot of issues with the program. From the time we start Vista in our environment it was a problem. I would really like to dig into windows 7 and see alot of the technical aspects of the OS instead of the 'O look something shiny and pretty' and more on the lines of 'It handled these 4 or 5 programs and it went this many days before the memory really gave us a problem'

  • ironbibleironbible

    Our real problem is vendor support. we are a banking/insurance/wealth management corp and we have to be very weiry of anything that we put into place. The security breach on teh Vista was just one of the main cause of pushing away from Vista. Vista is not very beneficial in our environment because we had things we called 'Vista Fits' when we used the computer for more than a solid day and the computer would just go bizerk and we had to reboot. I think that had alot to do with the Memory but still that raises the questions on expenses and computer assests. With the upgrade to Vista alot of out computers have to be upgrade on memory and/or computer. I know alot of people said that they dont have alot of issues with the program. From the time we start Vista in our environment it was a problem. I would really like to dig into windows 7 and see alot of the technical aspects of the OS instead of the 'O look something shiny and pretty' and more on the lines of 'It handled these 4 or 5 programs and it went this many days before the memory really gave us a problem'

  • ahmedahmed

    heloooooooo

Remove this comment

Remove this thread

close

Comments Closed

Comments have been closed since this content was published more than 30 days ago, but if you'd like to continue the conversation, please create a new thread in our Forums,
or Contact Us and let us know.