It was a joke, but it's not hard to see why many would assume it was real.

The fact is that C# is getting more complex and it's no longer the 'VB with semicolons' that it first appeared to be.

It's getting more powerful which means it's getting more difficult to get to grips with all of its subtleties and complexity. If you don't have a strong OO background and are the traditional self-taught VBA or VB guy it will be a total nightmare trying to follow some of the code examples that are appearing with all the new announcements.

Is that a bad thing? No. You still have VB.NET to make life a bit easier.

Will it make it more difficult for the 'traditional' VB6 programmer to transition (I say this as a VB6 programmer myself who made the switch to C# when it first shipped)?. Absolutely.

The big challenge for Microsoft is in retaining that 'hobbyist' market - much of which is responsible for Microsoft's huge success in the marketplace. VB.NET is considered by many to be too complex and it will be interesting to see how their efforts to 'keep things simple' for that market pan out with all the new features coming in.