Karim wrote:
Jeremy W. wrote: Alternate definitions include "promoting a product, service or viewpoint".


Ok, so if someguy posts to a newsgroup, "This Microsoft product SUCKS!" and a Microsoft employee says, "No it doesn't!" then the Microsoft employee's reply can be dismissed as "marketing" because he is "promoting a viewpoint?"


No...

Well it is, loosely, marketing. But you wouldn't say that the dev's job was a marketing one just because he did that on occasion. But, if the guy's job was to monitor communities for that type of feedback and then respond to it, then yes he would be in a marketing position.

Or, if it was his job to create a community where people who be able to see ways in which that product DIDN'T suck, then yes, he'd be in a marketing position.

You don't have to be in Marketing to do marketing. Many, many positions at MS are marketing positions without being part of the Marketing organization, including Product Managers, Evangelists, Architects and GPM's (and to a lesser extend PM's).

...

I have no idea why there's so much pushback on this. Channel 9 was designed to improve relations with developers. That's a marketing definition if I ever heard one. Scoble's job is to empower Channel 9, to blog and to act as an ambassador for MS to the developer (and wider) world. Sounds like marketing to me.

You don't need to be hired as a Marketing Manager to have marketing as part of your job description.