Totally. XML saves us hundreds of hours here at work. We have a huge organization (roughly the size of the Redmond campus, as I understand it). We have ActiveDirectory, eDirectory and LDAP X.500 services running. We have Exchange, Notes and Groupwise in our "larger organization". We use NT, AD and eDirectory for authentication.

XML ties it all together.

If an account gets created (anywhere), it'll create all the other appropriate services: Directory Services info, email, domain accounts, default group memberships.

Similarly if things get changed, deleted, suspended, etc...

And that's just the basics, nevermind the real big mainframe-integrated stuff (finally got Apache and MySQL on the mainframes).

XML is fantastic. It really allows communication to be easy at the enterprise level.

Most people who say "XML isn't for everything" don't understand enterprise systems (not all, but a chunk) and are purely looking at things from the web / SME perspective. In those environments it simply makes a different kind of sense, mainly because you don't see the XML.

What happens when GreatPlains integrates directly into your local HR/Accounting package? XML. How about when you're sync'ing departmental SQL Servers into an organizational one? XML (hopefully).

XML isn't just the lingua franca, it's a godsend. I remember trying to develop apps like these before XML, and it was a serious pain. CSV files? Relying on destructible LDAP?

There isn't a way to express how much that makes me shudder. For programmers, XML is good. For businesses, it's huge. Ask Novell, it's how they do all their sync'ing, which is making them a lot of money these days.