PetKnep wrote:
85% of statistics are made up. I have no data and will not provide any anecdotal evidence. I'm gonna go out on a limb and say the guy is pulling your chain though. You would think the internets would say something if 85% of MS dev teams were on scrum.

The WDS team used a modified version of scrum and I expect our new group will keep using some sort of it.

The main thing is that you should not take it as a religion. Forget about books and websites that tell you the stupidest things as they were edicts from lesser gods. I think the most important thing scrum provides is a way to track progress; we had scrum meetings three times a week that went on like this:

1 - I walk in with my laptop, attach it to the projector and start up a tracking spreadsheet (that I just built from our bug database five minutes ago)

2 - Devs make fun of me/my accent/my sweaters.

3 - Going alphabetically, I filter the spreadsheet by dev and he tells what he's doing and an estimate of time remaining for each bug; I make a little note on each bug entry.

4 - If some dev is done with his work, do some quick rebalancing, taking bugs from overloaded devs and reassigning, this is always based on consensus.

5 - The meeting ends in 30 minutes, I send the spreadsheet to the whole team and update the bug database with the new estimates.

The key was to keep the whole thing fast and fun, so everyone was involved and felt ownership of thier area.

Also, we had daily triage meetings among PMs to decide what to do with issues that cropped out during testing the previous day.

It worked pretty well, as everybody could check very quickly where we were in the project and how much time/effort we had left.

If you have any specific question, I'd be happy to answer (please don't mock my highlighter yellow hoodie, please Smiley )