Ray6 wrote:


Yes, that is a good example; unfortunately, it is very rare.  While I was using a Mac app, I usually found that it was a case of form over function. I couldn't find a personal finance application that comes close to matching the functionality (or ease of use) of Money or Quicken



I belive all Apple computers come pre-loaded with Quicken. I've been looking at a new financial app called Cha-Ching. It looks promising, at least for simple financial management. It's nowhere near as fully-featured as Money/Quicken. Which, in my mind, is a good thing. Smiley


Ray6 wrote:


Not really the same; although Windows does have Win32 (and that was a nightmare) it also had a huge range of other toolkits from companies other than Microsoft. .NET has the same advantage; lots of third party tools and a whole host of languages, and not just from Microsoft. On the Mac platform, you basically take what Apple gives you.


Not really. There are a lot of 3rd party frameworks out there to make the OS X devs life a little easier. The Omni Group has a few. There's no where near as many as there are for the Windows platform, but I think that's a function of market share.

Ray6 wrote:

Lazycoder2 wrote:
That being said, the Leopard release will bring some HUGE changes to the Cocoa framework. Garbage collection being the one I'm most looking forward to.


Better late than never, I guess ....



You said it. Retain/Release gives me COM flashbacks. Bleh.