Colin Angus Mackay wrote:
A guy I know who used to run Alpha Courses (i.e. he'd convert people to Christianity) but is now an atheist told me that one of the reasons he quit was that he'd convert people who had a problem. That would work out for a while until something happened and they fell back into their old habits. e.g. An alcoholic becomes tee-total for a while after "finding god" but for what ever reason falls off the wagon. This time round they fall much harder than they did before. Because this time they hate themselves for what ever it is they don't want to be doing, but this time round god hates them too.

He realised that what was getting people out of their hole was personal will power. It was nothing to do with supernatural beings living in the sky. Yes, people occasionally failed, but when they failed "with God" they got in much worse mess than they were in before. When they failed and it was just them they weren't burdened with the additional distress of having disappointed some mythical bearded guy which they had taken to be real.

So, in short, finding god is probably the worst solution to any problem.
Uh...the Alpha Courses have a few well known "issues", and one of their notable downfalls is that they tend to get people "hooked on an experience" rather than sticking to what the Bible says. In some cases, they can actually make things worse. And although I can't speak for the other poster, I would argue that medicine does have its place...and in some cases it is needed. But yeah, not dealing with people's underlying problems is not good either...oh and then there is this rather sobering passage...which seems to address things such as false conversions. But it's not a person's job to force somebody else to convert. 

btw, hi Rory. Welcome back!