With site design (and even small database design) there are often several issues involved...(warning: preaching ahead)

1) How the information behind the scenes is organized
2) What the UI looks like
3) How easy it is to navigate
4) How it handles changing future business needs

Often, you'll have to make many compromises on these and other issues.

For #1, this is a huge consideration for developers and the people who have to maintain the site. The end user may or may not care about this part...although I would argue that a well designed and well organized back-end make things go a lot smoother on the front end.

For #2, this can be a selling point for an end user, but if you behind the scenes organization is bad, or the tab order (for instance) is all whacked (#3), nobody will care.

For #3, poor navigation can kill a site fast. 

For #4, this can be a pain for both the end user and the developer, but often many of these issues don't crop up until a system is already in place and in use. Here's where previous experience can really pay off.

That said, I think the look of your idea is great. I noticed several differences in the organization of the information between all three versions, however...so I'm not sure what I can comment on there. I don't know who your end users are.

btw, thanks, now I'm thinking of picking up a bacon double cheeseburger from Burger King for lunch.