phreaks wrote:

cheong wrote:
IMO the law is next to useless... Considering the real criminal could just use weird encryption algorithm to encrypt their data (I think most e-related crimes criminals can afford that) then rename the file to .DAT format. When the police come they can promptly hand out the key, and have the police scratching their heads to figure out what algorithm should be used to decrypt it...


Hmm, you seem to be awfully aware of the various methods, are you one of those hardened criminals the article was speaking about that this law will protect us from?


LOL. Why attack cheong personally?

You cannot really legislate against technology. Period.

The hacking underworld have, and will always outsmart everything technologically speaking.


I mean another method is to use dummy messages, where the key would decrypt a dummy message from any news paper article.

Or use steganography.

what I think is , how are they going to enforce that law? What does this say about privacy in the digital world we live in today? We use encryption to maintain and enforce our right to privacy as citizens. Bankers use SSL to scramble your Credit card information so that its secure and is private.

But these laws are fundamentally illegal, because they break the law of privacy that exists in most democratic constitutions.

I want to know what would happen to a British citizen who has a file that is encrypted, and they lost the key to decrypt it? Is it fair to jail these people for something that they cannot decrypt?

Laws are meant to be  broken in this case, and when freedom is outlawed, only outlaws will have freedom.

Peace:)