gman wrote:

Beer28 wrote:Here is one major difference, click here and scroll down to the part where it says you can download the source code


I guess you never heard of Rotor or Mono.. the C# compiler is free... The SDKs are free. what was your point again?


Not to mention Portable.NET and DotGNU.

gman wrote:

As a matter of fact, I take you one further. Microsoft has submitted C# to the ECMA for standardization. Has Sun done that with Java? Nope. Ya know why? Cause Sun wants to control Java and everything about it. Which company is more open?


Not only submitted, but the standard was ratified. I'm not sure of the current status with the ISO... they may have ratified it as well.  And it's not just C#, but also the CLI.

 Sun has an interesting history in regards to the standardizing Java, actually.  Been in the process of proposing on more than one occasion with both major committees, and pulled out every single time.

gman wrote:

Beer28 wrote:The other major difference, is that you can code anything from a console chat server application to a full blown 3d video game and it will work exactly the same on windows, linux and macintosh. A 3d modeler, a media player, a hello world application. With Java, it's all good.


Blah blah, yeah and it looks and acts like total crap just the same on all those platforms. And it also runs slow as a dog. Who wants to write apps for Linux anyway? For all 3 people who run it?


Now you're being as bad as Beer28.  MANY people running Linux, and MANY companies care deeply about portable applications.  It's in everyone's best interest that MS remembers this and not only allows for it, but promotes it.

That said, there are numerous portable applications written using C#.  Most of your big ASP.NET applications run on Mono, for instance.  So, Beer28 is spreading FUD.

gman wrote:

Beer28 wrote:Another plus with java, is that possibly the very best IDE to code java is completely free in netbeans


Hahah, now you are just being silly, Java IDE's are pathetic... And I guess you never heard of the Visual Studio 2005 Express products... compeletely FREE.


Actually, the best Java IDE is arguably Eclipse (I know this is a heated debate among some).  And MS can (and in some cases has) learn a lot from features available in that IDE.  I personally dislike the Java language, but when I had to develop in it for my employer, Eclipse was something of a wonder.  There are things I like better about VS, but for productivity, Eclipse wins hands down.