Charles said:
intelman said:
*snip*

Well, as you can see that is a defunct blog... Is this debate about how Microsoft misrepresented UAC in the Vista timeframe or is it about UAC and the distinction between running as a standard user by default and core security boundaries of the underlying system? This is an argument about the past, right? Sure, OK, the UAC blog, Windows blogs, media outlets, even Channel 9, misrepresented UAC as a security feature during the Vista daze. Can we move along? Can we focus on the here and now? DeVaan's post is from 2009. The context is Windows 7. I've lost track of the problem, exactly. What's the issue again?

C

"Sure, OK, the UAC blog, Windows blogs, media outlets, even Channel 9, misrepresented UAC as a security feature during the Vista daze. Can we move along? Can we focus on the here and now? DeVaan's post is from 2009. The context is Windows 7."

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So you had it wrong all these years and now you guys saw the light? Just when the UAC issues with Win7 appeared?

fortunate coincidence! Seriously, I am disappointed. I've read all the anti-MS hate posts on slashdot and various other internet holes and was never impressed by their stupid arguments, but, reading this inane responses from you guys... I've lost a substantial amount of respect for MS. This move could be the biggest negative advertising in the tech community for Microsoft EVER.

Look how much noise it generates:

http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=%22windows+7%22%2Buac&aq=f&oq=&aqi=g10

This could turn into something huge.

Of course I understand you guys. You wanted to please the blogger and slashdot crowds with that move, but the approach was obviously shortsighted. You know it now of course - but what do to? It's too late in the product cycle to over-engineer UAC to such extend that it will detect code injections and such (if it is even possible), and setting the UAC default behaviour back to Vista levels.. well, I still think it would be the right choice, but you guys advertised so much with the claim that Windows 7 is "less annoying than Vista" so that that move will generate negative press. But seriously, isn't it better to fix it now, get some bad press for one month, than not fixing it, and getting bad press about it for the next several years?

I  can imagine that the guy who came up with the bright idea to make UAC "less annoying" got, when the flaws started to come up, an facial expression found on infants who have just crapped into their pants. He propably sat stupidly in an oozing euphoria, grinning from ear to ear, subcounsciously knowing he made a serious error, but not really understanding it.