PerfectPhase said:
ktr said:
*snip*

I disagree with a lot of that, pretty much all the new features in c# are additive.  Just because LINQ is there doesn't mean you have to use it, same with dynamic and even generics.   Especially in a taught course, I would have thought that there would have been some structure to introduce features in a logical, progressive way.

 

What I find more disturbing in general is the number of times comments like 'CS students with no experience with programming' keep turning up, they just baffle me.  Whatever you chose to study I would have thought that you would have at least some interest in the subject before choosing that course. 

What I find more disturbing in general is the number of times comments like 'CS students with no experience with programming' keep turning up, they just baffle me.  Whatever you chose to study I would have thought that you would have at least some interest in the subject before choosing that course. 

I'd say that roughly fifty percent of the first year students when I started doing CS had no previous exposure to programming whatsoever. Not even a single line of BASIC. They had to start from scratch with C++ which isn't much fun.

 

Not to mention that the same basic programming course that teaches the CS students C++ was also mandatory for physics, chemistry, astronomy and LST (Life, Science & Technology) students. Guess how much interest they have in learning something like C++.

 

Quite a lot of the people who picked CS in my year were of the "I didn't know what to study but I kinda like working with computers so let's do this" kind. Of course, Leiden is a classical University and its CS curriculum leans very heavily towards the science side. As a result, it has very little to do with "working with computers" and all of these people will invariably change majors after the first semester.