Blue Ink said:

It depends on your definition of Enterprise Dev. Most of the mobile applications we have worked with have become web applications or are based on web services anyway. The only exception (a remote controller for some robotic equipment) requires constant connection, so a DB wouldn't help.

 

Your set of applications seems to have some characteristics that make them not very generic:

- It is ok to work with stale data (this is often a big no-no).

- It is critical that information is constantly available, but it's ok to queue up anything you need to send.

- It must work in areas where connection is non-existent, and will stay such for a long time.

 

I don't doubt such scenarios exist, but I cannot see them as being the most common in the industry, so my answer to your post title is "no, thanks".

Hello

Thanks for the reply.

 I'm not saying that no enterprise apps can be written using the WindowsPhone platform. I am saying that a lot of "out in the field" apps will not work if they have to hit a live server for data all the time. Also after listening to Charlie Kindle's WindowsPhone Intro webcast, it was immediately made clear in the question and answer period that I am not alone in the concern about no local db. Thanks you devs for speaking up.

Charlie talks about user experience.

Will the data come back faster from the device or a server?

- obviously the device;

Will it take more battery power to get the data from the server or the device?

- obviously hitting the server will take more time and battery power and lower the user experience.

 

He made it clear they are targeting the consumer in this release in the presentation. I just hope he realizes Apple might eat Microsoft's lunch in the enterprise while he plays catch up with the consumer.

 

Dave K