Dan said:
javaplayer said:
*snip*

Why can't I just use all my libraries and leverage my existing code in Android applications for mobile phones with .NET?

With Java I just have to change the interface UI and that only takes me a few hours. With .NET I have to rewrite the entire application, and that costs tens of thousands of dollars.

 

LOL, if you have a Java application you need to re-write your entire application for iPhone or Windows Phone too. For Andriod, you can use mono to reuse your .NET libraries in a mobile application. That sucks that you even have to change the interface UI for Android, so you have to rip & replace the whole UI?!

 

With Java, all I have to do is extend my main class with JApplet to make it into a web application. No extra code is required. Only to sign the app with a CA cert that is in the Java root certificates, and users can just use the app in the browser. Why is it so much harder to port apps from the desktop to Silverlight?

 

Show me a customer or top Web site that is using Java applets today. Applets are dead and are replaced by JavaFx. Let's ask the same question, why is it so hard to port an existing Struts application to JavaFx?

 

I can simply run my existing Java code in Google App Engine for managed load balanced deployments with GWT, and the tools to write and run my code in Eclipse are completely free. The Tomcat stack is totally free to deploy on as many servers as I want with CentOS.

 

I agree that Eclipse the best Java tool out there, and there are certainly several customers evaluating cloud deployments, which is why I love the fact that Windows Azure supports Java, including AppFabric support and we even have an Eclipse SDK! Because when you want the ability to infinitely scale, or if you want the option of using a real database in addition to Table Storage, Windows Azure is the best choice out there.

 

 

"how me a customer or top Web site that is using Java applets today."

 

http://www.tdameritrade.com

All the tools are written in Java, and displayed as JApplets.

 

http://www.godaddy.com

Many of the tools such as the FTP web client is written as Java JApplets.

https://hostingmanager.secureserver.net/ftpapplet/sftpapplet.jar

They license the FTP applet from JScape for their users.

 

http://wiki.developers.facebook.com/index.php/Facebook_apps_written_in_Java

Many apps on FB are written with Java. The uploader is Java.

 

So there are three, but there are hundreds of thousands of websites that use JavaFX and JApplets on the web. Any website that has advanced tools that can not be displayed with AJAX due to complexity and or real time data display are usually written in Java as Applets rather than Flash which is the popular choice for games, and adverts.

 

"LOL, if you have a Java application you need to re-write your entire application for iPhone or Windows Phone too. For Andriod, you can use mono to reuse your .NET libraries in a mobile application."

 

Windows Mobile is not too popular these days. How are you going to write a mono app for Android as an APK? Mono Droid is still alpha. Do you think an enterprise would actually release a commerical app with their name on it to the Android platform with Monodroid?


"real database in addition to Table Storage"

 

You can use SQLite in addition to Datastore and Datanucleus. App Engine is just one way you can distribute Java Applications in the cloud. There are actually hundreds of SQL implementations as well with Oracle, PostGRES, and MySQL.