javaplayer said:
Dan said:
*snip*

"how me a customer or top Web site that is using Java applets today."

 

http://www.tdameritrade.com

All the tools are written in Java, and displayed as JApplets.

 

http://www.godaddy.com

Many of the tools such as the FTP web client is written as Java JApplets.

https://hostingmanager.secureserver.net/ftpapplet/sftpapplet.jar

They license the FTP applet from JScape for their users.

 

http://wiki.developers.facebook.com/index.php/Facebook_apps_written_in_Java

Many apps on FB are written with Java. The uploader is Java.

 

So there are three, but there are hundreds of thousands of websites that use JavaFX and JApplets on the web. Any website that has advanced tools that can not be displayed with AJAX due to complexity and or real time data display are usually written in Java as Applets rather than Flash which is the popular choice for games, and adverts.

 

"LOL, if you have a Java application you need to re-write your entire application for iPhone or Windows Phone too. For Andriod, you can use mono to reuse your .NET libraries in a mobile application."

 

Windows Mobile is not too popular these days. How are you going to write a mono app for Android as an APK? Mono Droid is still alpha. Do you think an enterprise would actually release a commerical app with their name on it to the Android platform with Monodroid?


"real database in addition to Table Storage"

 

You can use SQLite in addition to Datastore and Datanucleus. App Engine is just one way you can distribute Java Applications in the cloud. There are actually hundreds of SQL implementations as well with Oracle, PostGRES, and MySQL.

 

look mate, you might be better off expending your energy to convince the Java dinosaurs to keep the faith - trying to convince .NET developers to switch to Java == massive waste of time. Why don't you try and convince some Python or Ruby developers to switch to Java? That ought to be fun to watch.

 

Java is the Cobol of the 21st century. Yes, enterprises will have Java code to maintain for decades, but it's long ceased to be a source of interest for anyone.

 

As for Android, I'll note it doesn't actually run Java on the device. Google didn't want to pay Sun phat money to licence the only bit of Java that they still charge for so they designed their own bytecode and virtual machine to run it.

 

By the way, Monodroid is in BETA and already benchmarks faster than the new JIT runtime in Android 2.2. I can't say that's a bad thing for Java because as I already said, Android doesn't actually run Java on the device, but it does show that it's hard to get motivated when you're giving something away for free.