Hi,

Long time lurker first time poster.

Firstly let me say thanks to the Channel 9 crew and MS for providing this great website. I love the whole philosophy behind it. Now to the topic at hand:

.Not for shareware
The .Net framework is a great  technology. It gives developers the ability to create complex programs more quickly and easily than previous technologies. It protects the users from malicious code and best of all its free.  So with all these benefits why aren't shareware developers going .Net crazy?

They should be, but for all the benifits .Net has it is still not a good option for shareware developers and here's why;

Point 1
 Shareware developers are not going to ask potential clients to download and install a 20 mb  framework just to run their application they are trying to sell. This is what MS is supposed to do if it wants to see the framework on home user machines. MS could easily do this by simply developing some cool free .Net games and killer .Net apps.

Point 2
Win32 applications will run on Win95 to Longhorn while .Net is really only meant for XP to Longhorn.

Point 3
It's easier to decompile .Net apps than Win32 apps (so I've heard anyway).

Point 4
Deployment. Even if the framework were more widespread deployed what happens if a non-framework user tries run your .Net application? Are there any Installers that auto-magicly detect the missing framework?

Point 5
What is this .Net thing anyway?
They're the types of questions you'll get if you try to force users to install the framework. Shareware authors don't want to answer these types of question and it doesn't help either that MS tried to market .Net as everything and the kitchen sink. How dumb was that whole affair?

Being a shareware developer I'd like to be able to use .Net. I like the technology but the points I raised are stopping me from going full steam ahead with .Net. What are your thoughts on this? Are there any shareware authors here or is everyone doing ASP or intranets?

 I'd love to hear some MS representatives comments on this.