Charles said:
rhm said:
*snip*

Irrelevant? Really? WP7 is making a bet on a "closed" platform model, on .NET. The argument for native support is moot. It's not going to be supported in V1. WP7 team believes SL + XNA should provide a rich set of capabilities for application developers targetting WP7 who also already use VS and .NET.... It's not rocket science. The company is making a bet on managed code + mobile devices. It could be that managed code will find it's soul mate in this context. Who knows? The phone isn't out yet..... Let's give this a chance. Why not?

 

C

Irrelevant, yes. You said:-

 

"I actually think the idea behind focusing on a managed sandbox app model in this case is...

 

b) you won't be able to crash the device with your buggy code since you won't be working at the memory level directly, etc..."

 

50+ million iPhones says this is a false argument. There are lots of apps that crash, none of them take down the phone. Moreover, even if running unmanaged 3rd party code was a security or stability issue, it hardly warrants browser-style security given that the app store requirements mean that for stability concerns you can remove the app (not only from the store but apparently remote-delete it from people's phones) and for security concerns, you have the developer's name and address. But like I said, it's not a concern if your OS has good underpinnings.

 

As for the subject of native code being moot, it might be now, but I wouldn't sound so glib about it given that what it means is you are metaphorically sticking your fingers up at developers experienced on other mobile platforms, including your own previous phone OS, in favour of generic .NET developers, most of whom spend their days writing web-related code. Now I'm sure devs will pick up WP7 development quickly enough to bang out millions of task list managers, tip calculators, branded RSS readers and other junk that fills app stores everywhere, but it's the games that make up the bulk of sales and Microsoft could have had hundreds ported over, but no, instead generic .NET developers are going to use XNA - an environment that's so far only attracted the attention of hobbyists (and then only because it's the only way to get code on an XBox without a publisher contract or big bucks to drop on a dev kit) and with little or no game development experience, will create what?

 

"The company is making a bet on managed code + mobile devices. It could be that managed code will find it's soul mate in this context. Who knows? The phone isn't out yet..... Let's give this a chance. Why not?"

 

Managed code already found it's soul mate on mobile devices about 10 years ago - it's called Java MIDP. For what it's worth, I'd prefer to do my iPhone development in C# - W3bbo is the one who's desperate to use native code - I'm just pointing out that the decision is not without consequences as far as games are concerned. I mainly entered this thread because it's about disappointment at the API surface of WP7 overall and I share that disappointment. It's not even where other platforms were 2 years ago - and while there are some things that have been left out probably for reasons of not having the resources to build them in version 1, there are other things where it's clear they were done for nanny-state reasons.

 

And also, you can say "we couldn't get everything in, it's a version 1 product" to developers, but what about consumers. I couldn't recommend WP7 to anyone to actually buy based on it's capabilities unless it's very cheap. At the same time, how do we know this isn't another experiment that's going to be abandoned like Kin or left to rot like Zune HD (supported dropped in XNA4)?