I do have some beef with Scoble's apparent assertion that every site should have an RSS feed. I guess if the site is intended to be updated regularly and you want people to notice when it's updated then it should have a feed, but otherwise it doesn't seem necessary - certainly it doesn't deserve the scorn it gets from the blog fanatics. It does seem fair though that if you want to call something a blog it should have an RSS feed. I even found myself slipping into Scoble mode the other day and emailing CNBC about their new blog (hosted on MSN!) not having a feed (which they added soon after - I guess it's a checkbox option).

Blogs have their place but I don't think people should have one unless they've actually got something to say. It does seem that now everyone is encouraged to have a blog, the crumbs of useful information they might have posted to more relevant forums and newsgroups get put in their blog instead and if they're someone who generally doesn't say anything interesting, readers who might have benefitted miss out because they don't subscribe because they don't want to plough through the dross.

On the whole though RSS has saved me time because there's about 20 sites I visit regularly that I used to constantly reload throughout the day to see if anything had been added and now the RSS reader does that for me. But I do then find myself looking for more sites to read to fill up the time I saved. Parkinson's law at work.

As for the "blogosphere", I've resisted using this term up to now, but really it is a massive circle-jerk with everyone linking to and quoting each other, trying to create new mini-celebrities as it goes. The networking, self-promotion and personality cults are things that go on in other spheres of course.

And don't get me started on the subject of wikis. I could write a whole book on how stupid, lazy and inappropriate wikis are for just about every use  except what they were intended for which is collarborative document writing, and they're not even good at that.