My critisisms of Longhorn are fair: fair from the standpoint of a hypothetical business owner. I have 500 machines, why do I need to upgrade to Longhorn?

>You can't, none of the computers today will be able to run longhorn.

Let me state this in the clear: what I am trying to get at is, what does Longhorn offer over Windows XP besides the usual?

>Every day new advancements in hardware become available, more memory, 64-bits processors, bigger harddrives, faster networks... Maybe we also need a new operating system that can handle all this new stuff and take advantage of it.

Saying things like: "Customers want everything that longhorn will be" is just a cover. What defines Longhorn vs. XP, 2003?

>The pillars that you will mention under this line.

There are three pillars to this new OS:
>Actually there are more than 3 pillars, but you obviously didn't do your homework.

Avalon-> Pretty 3-D graphics. MS makes the case that most systems have 3D graphics accelerators. Ok, so we get better graphics, and lower CPU. But what about the ### million server motherboards that are integrated with RageXL 8 MB chipsets? Or Intel (whatever they call it)?

They cannot support even the lowest Aero experience.

>Computers without 3d-hardware will go to the 3th tier experience which means the classic (win 2k interface). You forgot that Longhorn is NOT targetted at servers.

Indigo-> More secure/easy network transport. Nice, but everything (software) needs to be upgraded to take advantage of it.

>Like webservices, it's easier to send an automatically generated xml-file than:
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WinFS-> Single most overblown technology, ever. Yes, extra data is nice, yes, having containers & extra search items is nice. Search will certainly be faster. But put down the fanboy sign, and think. How often do I use Search? How often do you use Search? Hourly? Daily? Weekly? Monthly?

The last time I used Search was for hunting down some header files in the \Windows\System32 directory. That was three weeks ago.

>You don't know what WinFS really is, do you?
 WinFS is used to organise some sort of library about your documents and media like: pictures, songs, movies, word, excel, powerpoint documents, tasks, calendar, mailmessages and people. For example: you place 2 items in your calendar: 1-6 july vacation. After this vacation you connect your digital camera and download some pictures of that vacation. WinFS will automatically notice that those pictures were made during your vacation and give them a title like 'Holiday 2004".
Did I mention something about about the search-function? Not once.


The problem MS has, is that 1.) they no longer innovate. Apple with the Ipod is a classic (if overused) example. 2.) they are telling their customers what they want. Classic mistake, results in a market backlash.
>You don't call those pillars of Longhorn innovation? What do you call inovation?
For (2), at the moment WE (the developers and IT enthousiasts) are telling on Channel 9 what WE want from MS.
What did Apple innovate with their Ipod?

Innovation is->>>>solving a problem, annoyance, etc.
>That's problem-solving not innovation. Innovation is inventing something new that didn't exist yet.

WinFS solves the Search problem very well. But it is not needed often: most users keep their files in the "My Documents folder", and running Search on that is just dumb. What they should do (in conjunction to WinFS) is over a preview (first paragraph) of the documents in a folder. Running Search is absolutely fantastic when you get about 50 hits, and have to open each one of them to find the file you're looking for.

*Whistles to MS* If Google implements a feature where there is a link to a file, plus a preview of the file (image, text, etc.) below it, we all know who is going to be dragged through the hot coals.

Avalon solves...window painting problems. Tearing, refreshing, little thing like that. I suppose if Adobe used the GPU for its image transforms, yeah, useful. But GPUs are not up for that kind of work.

>Avalon does more than just solving this problem. It innovates too. The desktop as you know it (since win95) will be replaced with something completely new.

Indigo solves the sockets problem (so I hear) for developers. More secure.

>Indigo and webservices are operating at a much higher level than the socket stuff.

What I'm trying to imagine is this sparkling vision everyone has of Longhorn, and how this integrates into a business. What does Longhorn bring to Manufacturing? Healthcare? Education?

>Here you have some concept videos about Manufacturing, healthcare, estate stuff and soon education too.
http://msdn.microsoft.com/Longhorn/productinfo/conceptvid/default.aspx

I'd settle for something in the Industry/Consumer categories.

>At the moment Microsoft isn't concentrating much on the consumers but more on developers because they are the ones that will have to use most of the new technology in lh.
It will take awhile before commercial apps become available that take advantage of all this new stuff.