But why buy the hardware (aside from SQL/developers/artists/gamers who need the additional capabilities) when Windows XP fulfills these capabilities just fine? Yes, with Longhorn you get nicer drivers, a little more glitz, but where's the killer?

>Could you replace xp with 95? No? That's because certain programs rely on new technologies in XP. Like new theme, BITS, external desktop, text-to-speech, ...

Aright, three main pillars, though there are more. I've done my homework, and I have a copy of Longhorn sitting a few feet away from me.

>The problem is you're making these statements based on what you saw from this Developer Preview of Longhorn. I've worked with this preview too and every time I get the same feeling as you: "where's the killer?". The difference is that I know that this is just a preview and that all the changes were under the hood. The version that we got to see was not even beta.

Computers without 3d-hardware will go to the 3th tier experience which means the classic (win 2k interface). You forgot that Longhorn is NOT targetted at servers.
>Longhorn server is derived from the same codebase, and will be out a few months later. Try again?

Server 2003 was derived from the codebase of XP, did you see the Luna style in 2003? Read again:
"Computers without 3d-hardware will go to the 3th tier experience which means the classic interface."


To be honest, I've been trying to gain a real grasp around the technology. From what I've gathered, WinFS is a glorified metadata service, running on top of NTFS, with a few APIs that are supposed treat files as containers accessible to Outlook and a few other pograms. Search is part of that. But the question is, how many people are going to rush out and buy Longhorn with that in mind? So, in addition to a better Search, now I can have Calender download vacation photos, and put them somewhere. Time spent setting up Outlook for this: 30 secs. Time spent copying the files to your folder of choice? 30 secs. I suppose inline data added by Calender might work...
>As a customer you would think this is "just another feature". It sounds true, but it is a big feature for developers.

You don't call those pillars of Longhorn innovation? What do you call innovation?
>They certainly are innovation, what I'm getting at is worthwhile innovation. To paraphrase HHGTTG, it's all fine and dandy if your customer's want a fly that can turn off light switches.

>I don't think we will see a revolution in computers, but ms's products will always be an evolution.

Sidebar? A new color scheme?
>Based on what you saw from the developer preview: yes. But when Longhorn goes RTM the whole graphical system will be changed.

Custom apps, that could easily be written for Windows XP or 2003 (2000 fits the bill).
>If winfs is used in an application then those apps can't run on xp or 2003. If One-click-deployment is used then those apps can't run on xp or 2003. If Indigo is used then those apps can't run on xp or 2003. Those custom apps are the reason one should buy Longhorn.

My point is that ->Longhorn comes out in 2006 (hopefully). It takes about 1-3 months for the big players to bring their products up to speed. But, with such an entrenched base, I do not see Longhorn as much of a success (keeping in mind its feature set).
>I think it will be a bigger success than with WinXP. Microsoft is already giving very early access to Longhorn for developers. With this in mind a lot of commercial apps will be available sooner for Longhorn.