I can vouch for Microsoft not being connected to the real world.  Sometime it might be interesting to review the public face Microsoft puts on its web site and decide whether it clearly and succinctly describes, in non-technical terms, the features and benefits of every product.  Microsoft's public face is that of the ignorant flack (Public Relations Specialist) -- one who is adept at putting an acceptably competent, conservative and sober corporate face on a jumble of saleable stuff that does exactly we-don't-know-what for whom and under what circumstances nobody seems to know.  I've been asked several times what good SharePoint server is and have been unable to give a good answer.  I think I know (I'm not sure) that it is software that centralizes access to a bunch of disparate shared folders in a vast corporate universe.  It solves the problem of keeping track of what is available and advertising its availability.  However, does Microsoft explain it in such terms?  Nope.  SharePoint (the name), like so many nouns nowadays in the commerce of computing technology, is self-defining -- the meaning is well-known to everbody who ever touches the code, writes technical articles or writes what passes for documentation.  Microsoft ends up believing, wrongly it turns out, that the entire world has got SharePoint (or any of 100s of other saleable entities) fully scoped out.  If I go to my boss and tell her we should buy such-and-such a Microsoft product, what am I going to do?  Point her at any of the 100s of fluff pieces whose subtext is "trust us" and whose core message is "pig in a poke" and "good for what?"  I think not.  But, it's such a sunshiney day.  Good for a long swim in the crystal blue pool.