> Because if you read what I write I am balanced in what I write about my competitors. Something you, and Ninajagarden, are not.

I note that it's a problem that the perceptions of people who are reading your blog and Channel9 are not in-line with your intentions of being fair and balanced, and you call me out as not being balanced in what I write?  Get off the defensive, dude.

> I say both positive and negative things about other people in the industry.

Why say negative things about people?  It's one thing to compare products, features, best practices... but people?

> If you only notice the negative things that says a lot more about you than it says about me. And, so far I've seen a whole lot of trolling and not very many posts about where I've "trashed" competitors.

Interesting.  I don't see trolling.  I see people expressing frustration and their opinions based on what they read, and your being dismissive and writing it off rather than questioning why.

You want to see "competitor trashing?" Go to Slashdot and read any thread about Microsoft. The stuff they say is vile compared to anything I've said about Firefox or Apple. I guess that behavior is OK in your mind because it's anti-Microsoft. (I've never seen you speak out about it).

That's right.  I'm not dismissive of the way the Slashdot community feels about Microsoft.  As a Microsoft employee, if I were to be dismissive of it, that would be a real problem.  There are reasons people feel the way they do about Microsoft and Microsoft products.  I don't believe in telling them their opinions are wrong, baseless, unfounded, and that they're crazy and don't see how well-intentioned we really are.  I believe in trying to understand why they feel the way they do, and fixing it by building better products and encouraging better business practices.

I went to a presentation given Friday by a product unit manager who called out a whole slew of reasons why people hate their PCs, and who is on a mission to fix it.  Don't call the Slashdot crowd a bunch of lunatics and dismiss them.  Realize there are justifiable reasons they feel the way they do, and take action to fix them -- even if they're incredibly biased and don't present their feedback in a constructive way.

>>why not acknowledge that your customers' perceptions are different than your intentions?  Why spin the situation, ask your customers if they even have jobs, if they even read your blog, which might be perceived as attempts to discredit their comments, rather than accepting their perceptions and opinions, and changing something about the way you communicate to fix it?

> Because both of you do not approach me in a rational way. If someone comes up to you at a party, and says "you're a jerk" without acknowledging your positive attributes that isn't an opening for a conversation about human improvement. It's just someone asking to fight. That's not rational.

I'm not sure what you mean by stating that I don't approach you in a rational way.  If a customer (or many customers) calls me a jerk, you can be damn sure I'll try to find out why before telling her to f*** off because she's wrong and I'm not a jerk.  These are customers we're talking about -- not some drunk jerk at a party!