, DeathBy​VisualStudio wrote

And what is this intangible quality of a native app that despite HTML5's super interactivity that it provides still has users preferring it over web apps? As I user I fall into this category of thinking. HTML5 advocates better figure out what that is if they are going to get more eyes on their apps (beyond the traditional web site that they can now trick-out with HTML5).

That intangible quality was explained in the web page I linked to. The browser adds a level of interaction that spoils the entire experience for end users and complicate the heck out of the code you need to write that lessens (but can't eliminate) the issues caused by the extra level of interaction. "Solutions" like Win8 JS applications, where you have no browser, fix this problem. That's why you also said "It's my understanding the W8 apps produced by Microsoft so far are all HTML and they seem to do was well as any WPF app I've used on the desktop." Yes, there's performance considerations, but frankly, most "apps" don't need a lot in the area of performance. Performance is also something that can be addressed in various ways when it is a necessary quality, often without needing to resort to "native" code. That's a lot of what we get out of modern HTML stacks, and it's good enough for a wide range of applications. Still doesn't mean JavaScript is a good choice here, due to it simply not scaling for large and/or complicated applications, but it *IS* a capable choice, and users won't care if you go that route, like they do when you go the web app route.