, Maddus Mattus wrote

@Sven Groot:

So, design tests that have a smalelr chance of being cheat at and help your fellow students become the best students they possibly can.

Sure, I agree with that, but that's easier said than done. Especially when you consider that elementary and high schools are often vastly understaffed (and the teachers are underpaid), and that at higher levels of education the teachers are often researchers who only teach because they have to, not because they want to.

I like how the Dutch DMV solved it. Multiple choice, all at the same time, limited time per question. No chance in hell you can cheat on those.

That's not a good example, because this only tests your ability to memorize (it's not as bad as some other multiple choice tests, because at least you're given real scenarios and asked to interpret them based on traffic regulations, rather than just regurgitate the rules). It's possibly the method of testing that least allows the students to use their creativity.

Plus, weren't you arguing that we should allow cheating because that's how the real world works? Why have you suddenly shifted to designing tests that prevent teaching?

(This is also an example of why "you can look stuff up in the real world" doesn't always apply, because you can't exactly Google road signs while you're driving)