, Maddus Mattus wrote

@Sven Groot:

That's where I don't agree with you.

Schools should (and are) be places where new stuff gets made up. Google was a project at a university, so was Facebook,.

But neither were made at primary schools or by A-level students.

I was to harsh with my original statement. Exact courses should be tested exactly. But the higher in education you go, the less exact and the more creative you become.

That is already the case, and is reflected by how courses are taught at different levels.

Primary school: What is 19 + 26 (exact answer required).

Secondary school (junior): If 2x + 4 = 8, what is x? (exact answer required with maybe one discretionary point)

Secondary school (senior): Solve the definite integral between 0 and infinity of (2/x^x)x dx (exact answer required, but with discretionary points for partial success)

University: Show that the cyclic subgroup C<P> is of length P-1 if and only if P is prime,  (multiple possible answers - most points are discresionary).

PHD: Make your own question and solve it, whilst demonstrating that the question was an interesting one that hadn't already been solved (all points are discretionary - indeed, even the number of points is discretionary).