The article mentions that southern EU countries are worst regarding nepotism; Spain, Italy, Greece.

I don't think those countries are as eager to correct nepotistic actions as their northern counterparts.

Germany has the advantage due to the east/west not knowing each other well enough so that the culture of "who you know" hasn't had time to grow into hard lines. I like that. They are kicking arse, too (as usual).

Blowdart quoted an article that points out how family owned corporations handed down to successive family generations are proof the nepotism is a working and workable model. I think that's a bit superficial. It doesn't address public employment, which it would have to do in order to be true. Of course, nepotism has no place in public employment.

If a family has capable offspring to hand business control over to, then that is workable, but many times the offspring are not capable and the business is run by hand-picked experts within the corporation and the offspring gets the big title and no teeth. Their parents/family lets them know that their ideas will first be vetted before being brought before the board members. Once their parents die, they are a serious liability to the company and companies can dissolve pretty quickly. I know a few of these scenarios from front row seats at small companies. Publicly traded corporations would yield a board who is not so interested in seeing CEO hand control over to an offspring. They may prevent it outright. Publicly traded companies are no longer family owned, of course, but usually the families hold onto a majority of shares. This is where nepotism is not a given right and should not be allowed without the board of directors vetting the offspring's capability, imho.

Nepotism can bring unqualified workers into the light. Those who 'recommended' the unqualified and exposed worker now has egg on his face. He recommended an incompetent worker. His word is now no longer honorable. His reputation suffers. This is why only a parent would push an unqualified worker into a job, because only a parent is that biased in favor of an incompetent worker. I suspect that in Spain and Italy, there is little if any backlash for a 'recommended' putz failing miserably. That would be a major difference from the USA right there. True?