, Dr Herbie wrote

@fanbaby: "What's sauce for the Goose is sauce for the Gander".

If MS are sued for anti-competitive actions, then so should everyone else who acts anti-competitively.  Imagine you peed on your neighbour's lawn and they sued you, then the neighbour on the other side peed on your lawn; wouldn't you think it would be unfair for them to get away with it if you didn't?

Herbie

 

EDIT: My argument above is purely based on personal morals, but we mustn't forget that MS is a publicly owned company, so they have to do everything they legally can to ensure a level market with their competitors (and if they do something illegal, they deserve to be sued).

 

EDIT, EDIT:  I'm not saying I don't see the irony, but suggesting that MS cannot morally make this argument is stretching credulity.

Microsoft may or may not have to do that as a public company, but I hope that isn't anyone's personal moral code. Its the opposite of morals, because it shows a lack of integrity. Integrity means you don't do something just because everyone else is doing it.

The #1 reason people act immorally is because they use this excuse, and then other people see them doing it and use that excuse, and then everyone is doing it and using that excuse. Meanwhile people imagine they're better than everyone else because they're only doing it because others are, while they imagine others aren't. That's what goes on in politics all the time. "Lets run smears against our opponent, because if we don't, they'll run them against us. Lets make deals with lobbyists, because that's what our opponent will do"

Personally, I don't buy the argument that companies can't legally act in a more ethical manner, either. Maintaining a good reputation is a good way to keep market-share.