, cbae wrote

@Richard.Hein: I don't think the issue has to do with whether or not an individual has a right to recall past memories, perfectly or otherwise. The issue has to do with the ease in which those memories can be distributed to others.

Honestly, I don't like the idea of people recording and publishing embarrassing or incriminating stuff about me, anymore than anyone else would, but how could it ever be anything else than a culture of mutual fear of reprisal that would ever stop it?  Unless you could put some kind of protection that requires everyone you are recording to give explicit permission for you to transfer some "memory", how could you ever stop it?  If our children and grandchildren grow up in an "always recording" state, then they probably won't even care.  The only plausible deniability that something happened would be to claim it's edited or CGI, and then the tools should be so good, who knows? 

EDIT:

Let's specifically think about memory sharing.  How could preventing certain memories from being shared ever be a right thing to do?  If you share a secret, you trust a person not to tell.  If they break that trust, then you don't trust them again.  You flag them as a betrayer of trust and everyone knows. 

If you watch a movie and share that memory with perfect recall, such that it's equivalent to another person watching that movie themselves, what right does the copyright holder have to your memory or your right to share that memory?