, Bass wrote

@evildictaitor:

It's a Khronos Group-backed standard, which is a member-funded standards consortium that represents a wide swath of the technology industry. Microsoft remains the only major web browser vendor that is not onboard with WebGL development or implementation.

That's because it's not a standard. It's a shim to OpenGL. Microsoft would probably back it they did a proper security job like they did with the <video> tag in HTML5 - by seriously locking down the number of codecs that are available and saying speed is important when playing a video, so let's not use javascript to draw everything and have direct lines of communication between websites and the graphics driver.

If there were some hypothetical 3D for web (let's call it Web3D) that was built from the ground up with security in mind, was all sandboxed, and was written in such a way that you could do stuff fast and securely, then maybe Microsoft would get on board.

But as it is, it's just bolting OpenGL to the side of a browser and then hoping that the guys that wrote OpenGL and the guys that wrote the graphics drivers that have to run the geometry and shader pipelines built it securely enough to cope with russian malware domains throwing dodgy bytes at them.