, jinx101 wrote

... people do like it but not when they're forced to re-learn 10 years of knowing where something is with no real gain. 

That's the essence of the Win8 issue for many existing desktop/laptop users and for many businesses with large desktop/laptop installations.

It's not so much that Win8 on the desktop is 'all bad' (although it definitely has some real 'issues' to be sorted) but that after spending time to re-learn how to do things, you gain... what? i.e. For many, it's just pain for no gain.

In the organisation I work for, we looked at it that way... what are we going to gain in upgrading from Win7 to Win8 and what is is going to cost us in lost productivity, user dissatisfaction (albeit excuses in some cases), re-training of support staff, etc? It just didn't stack up.

We have decided to sit out the Win8 cycle, and stay with Win7, which works well for us. The added benefit (to us) is that purchasing will be based purely on the need for hardware, rather than as a path to a new software platform - pretty much the same as we did for the Vista cycle, although the reasons were slightly different - so we will be buying less.