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Even on the desktop, they have made it difficult to "activate" .NET for applications. We dealt with this for several weeks trying to find a way to install (or activate it in the case of Win8) when installing our LOB app. Yes, you can go to the Windows features and check a few boxes to get it installed, but it was far too confusing for general users to navigate that. We had to jump through some crazy hoops, and cost us thousands of $$, to get our installer to activate that for them. Why would MS make it so difficult to activate the framework that they promote at the center of their development world?

Well that's worrying.  Fortunately for us, our customers have only just made the transition to Win7 from XP, so I guess I'll just have to keep my finger crossed that there is some solution to this before they upgrade to Win8 (or Win.next by the time they get around to it). It does feel like MS are trying for force us to the latest dev technology by making it harder to work with what we previously had. We are not going to take the hit of rewriting our entire LOB application just make make it easier to install on a new dev platform, we will just have to tell our customers not to upgrade.

, Visible = False wrote

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All of the videos and talks about this from Microsoft have left me scratching my head. None of them seem to go beyond what I would consider a dashboard. Where are the stock trading or ERP apps that really get work done? Everything I've seen (like the app from SAP) are nothing more than a fancy dashboard. If they want all us developers to move to that environment, where are the real productivity apps that we can look to as models? I'm really looking for answers here!

I have thought this too -- Store Apps seem to be small, highly specialised application, not LOB apps like our 300+ form monstrosity.  I have also yet to see a data-entry grid in a Store App, so we have no examples as to how this might perform.

 

Herbie