, evildictait​or wrote

There's even an entire fake directory structure in the Windows directory and the registry (C:\Windows\syswow64) which appears as C:\Windows\system32 to 32-bit apps just to maintain binary compatibility with old and crusty apps that aren't 64-bit aware.

Understood. But then again, most of Microsoft's big tools are still 32-bit only. Consider Visual Studio and SQL Management Studio as examples. There are very good technical reasons why they remain 32-bit, not just because they:

- are old and crusty

- can't figure out how to maintain compatibility

- refuse to break backward compatibility

My point is that Microsoft goes to absurd lengths to make sure that an app you compile today will work 10 years down the line, no matter how much they change under the hood in Windows.

I absolutely agree with you. I'm not worried about the desktop going away anytime soon. What I said was that I'm worried about the desktop area becoming deprecated and that there are already signs of it becoming legacy. I love the thought of moving forward, but please give me a path for doing so. The bridge to WinRT is not even close to being there yet. And using WPF to do anything remotely powerful puts you back on the desktop anyway.

frankly if you're worried about the future-proofness of your apps, then look at WPF versus WinForms. 

Yet another takeaway I had from Build is that WPF was not the suggested UI path moving forward. It's a choice, but not necessarily the one Microsoft is going to run with.

 don't believe everything you hear at Build.

I'll try not to believe everything.  Big Smile