, evildictait​or wrote

*snip*

 

People didn't like the start menu. Nobody was swanning around in 2011 saying to their neighbour - you know what really makes my day great? The start menu. You know my favourite part of Windows - the one part I couldn't do without? The start menu. God help me if I didn't have a start menu because then I would forget how to breathe.

No one is thinking about elevators all day, until the one you're using gets damaged.

, evildictait​or wrote

This whole show isn't about the start menu. It's about change.

Indeed, bad change.

Windows 95 was going to fail and was signalling the end of Microsoft's support for DOS and that Microsoft was making the interface more "childlike" and taking their OS less seriously. Who needs a graphical menu when you have memorized the manpage for that app? Stupid Microsoft. I don't even have direct write access to the screen buffer, so how can I write my app's graphics in a way that isn't going to be slow now? What a bunch of jokers Microsoft are.

Windows 95 has been covered already.

Windows 2000 takes too much power away from the user - and stuff like Active Desktop show Microsoft's "race to the bottom". They're taking away our Win9x interface that we all always loved and changing it (those b*stards). Is this the end for Microsoft?

Bullshit, apart from hyper-deranged freetard circles no one thought these things about Win2000 (Active Desktop was introduced with IE4 in the W95 timeframe). Taking power from the users? If there was any criticism, it was about the hardware requirements compared to NT4 and Win9x, not about the stuff you claim. And even those voices were kinda silent.

There was a Windows 98 color theme by the way.

Windows XP - once again, Microsoft shows us that they are willing to sacrifice the power user with "blue balloons" and bubble-wrap interfaces. Most of the Windows 2000 "features" are no longer included by default - you need to install them off the disk now. Even the telnet interface isn't installed by default! Goodness me - Microsoft are on their way out, 2003 - the year of the linux desktop! Thankfully at least you can set Windows XP to look like Windows 2000 via "classic mode". Thank god. We always loved that Windows 2000 interface. It was perfection.

Luna looked indeed silly compared to Win 2000, and many businesses ran it with the 2000 theme that XP shipped with (notice a trend?) But Luna hasn't made the handling worse.

, evildictait​or wrote

Oh my golly-gosh! Windows Vista has taken away our beautiful XP interface and replaced it with some kind of glass aero crappy b**! They took away our pinball game and we have to install third-party stuff like WindowBlinds to get our beautiful XP interface back that we always loved. Even our start menu has changed! Curses to you Microsoft! This, surely, is the end of the road for MS. 2006 - the year of the linux desktop for sure! The gadget-sidebar is a total joke and we've lost features like Active Desktop! Is nothing sacred? Silverlight and .NET in-the-box? Just flash and Java wannabees. Microsoft sure looks like it's about to go bankrupt!

Total bullcrap. Vista had indeed issues, but not the silly ones you're pretending. No one cried about .NET (Silverlight in Vista?!) and Pinball, the main problems were the bad drivers at start and slowness; partly because of bugs (network file copy), partly because of Microsoft's own stupid recommendations (Vista Ready). And there was the overblown DRM scare. I for one think that Vista was a very good OS after SP1 and after the drivers were fixed, but I am not gonna be deranged enough to think that all the outcry was because of Pinball and.NET.

Don't fool yourself. 

Windows7? It's Windows Vista SP2! Yet another nail in the coffin for Microsoft. Jump-lists? Pinning stuff to the oversized taskbar? When will Microsoft learn they need to put features in for customer to buy it! What a bunch of jokers.

Let's be frank here: Apart from some tweaks, Vista and W7 aren't exactly much different. It's a bug fixed Vista for the most part. (kinda like Win2000 <-> XP) The related server version Server 2008 R2 is called that for good reason.

Does that makes it a bad OS? No, but let's not pretend that that claim is without any merit

Windows8! Oh my god! My beautiful aero is gone! And that start menu that I definitely always loved. And my taskbar - that beautiful slightly-bigger-than-it-was-in-XP taskbar that I always loved has been molested by the removal of it's start menu! And gadgets! Oh how I pine for thee! My beautiful gadgets! SURELY this is the end of the desktop and Microsoft forever and ever!

You're forgetting one crucial thing: All the previous additions were pretty much for the better (except for Luna I guess) and people (and MS) were easily able to point out at the improvements and advancements. That is completely different with Windows 8. People post huge lists of failings all over the net and the fanbots so far weren't able to crack those criticisms down. Even in this very thread you can't claim what the great improvements are with metro menu that warrant the resulting regressions. In fact, you weren't able to squelch the criticisms in this entire forum. Isn't that worrying? Sure, there were always detractors, especially coming from the FOSS brigade, but never before was a Windows OS this hated by the Windows devs and admins themselves. Something is definitely different this time. I can't remember when MS censored posts to such extend like Sinofsky did on his blog (or ever in fact). I can't remember when there was such a silence on Microsoft's part on the issues.

Thankfully there are great alternatives to Windows now. We can all turn to Linux: They would never force an interface on their users that nobody really liked. Or we could all go to Google who never remove products or features that we might be using and certainly don't read our documents and emails in order to make money, or Apple, where all of our corporate applications run perfectly and who give us full control of our devices to do as we please.

I actually liked MS products and have no illusions about the competition. That's why Win8 is so infuriating.

And it's not only about the metro-menu and all the headache that brings, it's the whole approach. For example the darn "apps" themselves: How hard could it have been to include a "Pro mode" (with scary "You're on your own now!" warnings if needed) or something like that which would allow sideloading? They could still have their store and still make the enthusiasts
and "Pros" happy. It would have been easy to make the Metro-Notro-Win8stylestoreapps-whatever more appealing to the laptop and desktop users. How about more features availble the bigger the screen is? "Windows has detected you have a 24 inch screen, multi-tasking and windowing of Metro apps is enabled now". Stuff like that wouldn't be too hard, freeware like Bluestacks does it! But no, Microsoft has chosen the most limiting and existing-customers-repulsing way possible. That is why there are complaints and bad feeling all around. That's where the "walled garden" and "dictatorial" accusations come from. MS was a  quite comfortable choice between the strict Apple- and the free-for-all linux world, pretty much the golden middle, now they are doing their darndest to change themselves into a totally redundant MicroApple and this generates ill felings. The many game developers were annoyed for good reasons IMHO. And let's not start on the limitations of the metro apps.. Oh sure, they aren't forcing metro down on you, except they do:

Now let's forget the start screen, just open up an audio file on the desktop.. BAM - You're on a full screen monstrosity, with "parental advisory" graphics from obscene rap album covers and stuff like that. With no obvious way to get out of it. PROGRESS. They wanted to simplify Windows 8. That's why instead of clicking on an easy to spot bright red X, (that's faaar to power user for the common idiot to understand) you need to "grab" the application by its invisible head and drag it down the drain so that it can disappear. And if you managed to close it, you're back on the metro screen instead of the desktop (where you started). Just fabulous! So just playing a darn audio file means switching through completely different GUI environments and playing a mini-adventure. Same is happening when you open up pictures and movie files. Yes, that's what I call a great user experience right there. Then there's the DVD codec issue and WMP not playing them even if you have the codecs installed, mail apps that can't handle common protocols.. No one is going to change their provider just because subpar OS update decided it wants to out-hipster the whole world.

Sure, you can hack-around to link WMP back to the files etc. but shouldn't an "upgrade" make stuff.. you know, better?! How's stuff like that a good default experience? In the first beta versions, the welcome screen could not be clicked away. You had to drag it away with the mouse! Totally insane. That's one of the very few things they have fixed, but the fact that something like that made it into an alpha version, yet alone beta, makes it clear what kind of carelessness the "design" of Win8 truly was/is. I am pretty sure the main reason the server got metro too is to prevent "power users" running Server 2012 as a desktop replacement.

All that is just NOT comparable to the previous versions. Never before were there such regressions in usability of Windows and "feel" of the company. You cannot will that fact just away.

Then there's the whole subplot about their handling of developers and the whole Silverlight affair to promote the W8 craplets - killing SL just when it was going strong as LOB tool. The amount of badwil they have created with this OS among their (former) allies, devs and supporters is just staggering.