, DeathBy​VisualStudio wrote

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I disagree Andy. I think it does makes sense to have close buttons and good mouse support and jumplists because that's what desktop PCs needs and that's what people say when I plop them in front of W8. W8's new metaphor for applications life cycle et al is for devices. No matter how you try and tap dance around it W8 is a very glitchy, unfinished OS. It's a grand beta test that only a true Microsoft apologist can pile on enough "imagination" to deflect from its detractions. You know stuff like this gem:

Under normal circumstances you don't need to close apps, so putting a close button on the switcher is just begging for someone to accidentally "click" the close button rather than on the main switching part. It what sense does it make sense to design a UI such that bringing the app you want to the foreground is easily confused with closing it?

As for Jump Lists, they're very much a file-centric/launch parameter based approach to trying to provide a quick route into an application. When you aren't launching an app, but instead switching too one, they really don't make any sense. Of course an app being able to provide such a quick route into specific functionality, for those who want it, is very handy - so much so that Windows 8 apps can perform exactly that via Secondary Tiles and in a way which is much more flexible than Jump Lists could ever be.

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Really? A few cases like remote desktop? Oh and yeah if they'd only improve those pesky protocols...

Yes, really. Aside from Remote Desktop (or an equivalent) how many actual scenarios are there in which you are so fundamentally reliant on a connection to a remote machine that they can't possibly restore a usable UI state before a connection is restored? Can you name even one?

As for improving how it works underneath, yes that can help too. I'd put good money on Citrix doing a much better job when they release the inevitable GoToMyPC Windows 8 app.

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Oh yes because it's not a problem on your uber PC with tons of ram it certainly won't be a problem on Windows RT tablets with much less capable processors and a lot less ram. And if it a problem well they just must be holding it wrong.

You're argument is all over the place (as usual). If Windows 8 and the Metro approach is, as you say, only good for mobile devices, then it won't be any more of a problem for Windows RT tablets than it is for iPad users. If applications being suspended is as issue for such devices, then naturally it'll also make the iPad (which does the same) a complete failure too (hint: it wasn't) And if it's desktops you're worried about, then the spec of my current PC (which is a laptop) isn't exactly anything stellar, so it certainly won't be over the lifespan of W8. Nor is it necessarily a sign that it'll fail to work on a less capable device either, Notepad on this machine works just as well as it does on a ten-year old PC.