, AndyC wrote

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Yes, that is the concern. And the absolute most ridiculous way to try and prevent it is to have that button be hidden until you mouse over where it is, because then you're almost certainly going to have the situation where someone moves the pointer over what looks like the switch target and has already clicked the button before realising the magic close button has suddenly appeared beneath their cursor and they've just quit the application they wanted to use.

Of course you could alleviate that problem by having the user explicitly right click with the mouse to make the close option appear...

So you're going to give the Windows Store app IE guys a pass then huh? Nice.

I think the absolute most ridiculous way is to make things harder for the user under the guise that you are protecting them from a mistake.

The hidden charms & task bars and the way the "start button" behaves are no different in the element of "surprise" that you depict. "Every time I try and click on the damn start icon it disappears!" said Grandma before she keeled over from a W8 educed heart attack. 

I'd prefer the "x" was static (just like Windows Store app IE) but then you make up something else to whine about.

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In what sense is that not file centric? And it still ignores the way Jump Lists are implemented, which is fundamentally around providing launch parameters to apps.

Your working under the premise that an app centric world is the preferred. That premise is flawed. People want to get to their data as quick as they can and don't give a rat's arse if that's by opening the data from a menu from the shell or from within the application itself so long as it's the fastest. Of course you'll always prefer the apologist's position.

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So that's a definitive "No." to the question, can you name anything other than a Remote Desktop (or equivalent) application then?

And yes I'm ignoring admin tools that monitor sites, because most of the widely used ones in existence (such as the excellent Nagios), are already implemented as web pages and so clearly capable of operating in an entirely connectionless fashion.

With what -- only 2000 apps in the store? Maybe? Are you sure you want to go there? Looks like Citrix has a release out. I bet that's going have some pain points just like remote desktop. Can't wait for the others...

Come to think of it I have an app that would suck as a Windows Store app because of this very issue. It's an app that displays real-time weights from multiple scale heads. It's a WPF app that uses WCF with WSDualHttpBinding for communications providing both the real-time weight values from the scales and a control interface for the scales. The problem is that any time the user switch apps the connections would drop as the app was suspended. Like remote desktop the users of my app would have to wait for communications to be reestablished before they could do anything with the app. That's to bad too because of any of my apps this would be the best candidate for a Windows Store app port as it's written MVVM style and would work just fine full screen.

*snip*

I'm impressed you have W8 grade hardware, given that none has been released yet. Perplexed

It's sad to see you make up lame excuse after lame excuse for Microsoft. You really think a full blown Windows Pro tablet is going to be so much more optimized than the Build tablet that it will meet or exceed the iPad or an Android tablet on startup times? From sleep even? Dude, put down the crack pipe. It's not helping you.

"W8 grade hardware". Sounds like you're calling Sinofsky a liar considering he said we'd have 450 million customer available to us as launch day -- you know those upgrading from "W7 grade hardware."

Hey I hear Apple is looking for a new PR guy for their mapping app. I think you'd be perfect for it. You can use me as a reference; you'll get nothing but high marks from me.