@ManipUni: Caveat emptor.

Anyway, back to the regularly scheduled bickering...

What the holy hell are you even talking about? So Microsoft released a device into the consumer market, a consumer purchased it, found several very valid problems and now it is his fault for not being better qualified? And how does being better qualified/a pro even fix any of them?   

Saying this is a consumer device is like saying used car salesmen are honest. I'm sure there is some truth in it. The problems that he encountered would not have been mitigated by any qualifications. Rather, as a developer, working on something that is clearly a work-in-progress, there is a lower expectation of initial quality. Many developers are eager to try something new for the privilege of finding and reporting bugs to the appropriate channel. These behavioral traits differentiate MSDN subscription holders from the general consumer.

Also you accuse him of trying to "profit" from the issues while at the same time agreeing that all the issues are completely valid complaints? Make up your mind. Either they are or they aren't and he is just trying to get clicks. 

Yes. These two acts are completely orthogonal. I think the banality of the findings intensifies the attractiveness of the videos. The most shocking things in life are right under our finger tips.

That is one of the worst posts I've ever seen trying to defend a product. It isn't just an unreasonable defense but it is so far gone it is literally beyond my being able to comprehend how your brain could come up with the "he isn't a developer so the fact that Word doesn't save is HIS fault. He isn't a tech-journalist so it is HIS fault that Word is slower than his typing speed."

Seriously, I really hope you're trolling.  

Blame and fault are kind of loaded terms, so is stupid. You haven't used stupid, so I will. Anyone that buys one of these, and has any expectation of quality beyond the click sound that is produced by the kickstand or the keyboard, is stupid.

All that I know is that almost nothing was known about this device when it was made available for sight-unseen sale. The only conceivable scenario, that my brain can concoct, regarding the purchase of something like this, with the diminutive amount of information available, would be if the buyer were a developer or journalist. The developer would use it to develop and the journalist would use it to engage in journalism.

Again I would like to be clear on this, Surface looks buggy as hell, and it is my opinion that it should not be sold to people, who by means of marketing, have expectations of quality beyond what has been presented.

-Josh