@elmer: I've seen many attempts over the years of companies trying to configure new releases of Windows to look like the old version and it almost always ends up causing more problems in the long run for a very short-term gain. User's end up being exposed to whatever UI changes happen anyway as they use computers elsewhere, new hires find the "old way" confusing because they weren't exposed to it before etc.

If you want the old UI, you're almost universally better sticking to the older OS, until such point that the overall business benefits of upgrading outweigh any training costs. I certainly wouldn't ever go down the route of "upgrading" and then try to fudge the old UI back with an almost-clone bit of third party software like Stardock's offering. It's fine as a one-off solution for those who really can't let go, but not really a business solution.