I agree; it's got some great ideas in it but isn't quite there.

While it has a great screen the resolution is almost too high for the size. They had to fiddle with the desktop DPI to make things readable (albeit blurry) and touchable thus negating some of the benefit of the higher resolution. You can change that to a lower DPI but then things become hard to read and touch.

One review I read said something to the effect of "It's not a tablet and it's not a laptop. If you need a laptop get a laptop. If you need a tablet get a tablet." So what exactly is this new category of device that Microsoft is trying to get people to think they need? I know with the original iPad a lot of people were saying "What would I do with it? I have a laptop and a smartphone. What do I need with a tablet other than to have something on the coffee table." While the Surface Pro and similar devices are capable of much more that a coffee table media consumption device I have to wonder how Microsoft will get folks attention.

  1. Laptop replacement? Screen is too small for many content creators. Not as trustworthy on the lap (falls over for some).
  2. Tablet replacement? Great tablet but is overkill if you just want to consume content.
  3. Home PC replacement? It could work but for many you'd want an external monitor for long hours in front of the PC. Also it could pose a problem in those households where the PC is shared and someone has lifted the tablet to take to the coffeeshop. I think the all-in-ones are a better upgrade to Windows 8 in this case (and some of those giant "tablets" would be fun for shared table-top gaming experiences).

Like I've said before I've been using my Build 2012 tablet as a laptop replacement for quite awhile and it works but its full of compromises. That's why we're looking at the Lenovo Yoga 13 -- laptop first, everything else is icing on the cake.