, Dr Herbie wrote

@xxxcoderxxx: I would say it's just a different strategy: MS want to provide many options for developers to develop with (look at writing Win8 application for example: you have wrappers for C++, C# and  HTML & Java for access to the new API), while Apple seemed happier to just dictate that developers use one tool for their platform (have they relaxed a little on that front now, or is it all still Objective-C ?).

They'd prefer it, but they don't dictate it. What they don't allow is virtual machines running on top of IOS, so whatever you use has to compile down to the ObjectiveC runtime. As far as I know, IOS apps can be written in ObjectiveC/C++ (obviously), C#, Lua, Python, Ruby, SmallTalk and Lisp.

There are a couple of IDEs for alternative languages, though I'm not sure I'd want to actually write a program on an iPad.