, Bass wrote

@AndyC:

I don't know where you get your 99% number from? Some kind of study or something you could link to please? if I used my own observations when working for various organisations, I would say something like 100% of all companies have software developers. Tongue Out

If you honestly think most companies employ software developers, have any interest in software development or indeed even the slightest desire in diverting resources into something that isn't a core competency of their business, you're massively deluded I'm afraid.

, Bass wrote

@figuerres:

"""

Of the 740 companies surveyed, 42 percent said adoption in the non-technical segments was the No. 1 trend driving open source in 2012.

"""

Hmmm... so it's not just technical segments. This is interesting to me, because I never even worked in a non-technical segment before. Good to know.

And how much of that adoption was outside of the "big name" projects like Apache or Linux, both of which would fall under the category of having substantial commercial backing from known names. Nobody has argued that people avoid FOSS, rather that there is an inclination to prefer "known" products from reliable names far more then some random project started by your average Joe.

Also interesting, "Lack of formal commercial vendor support" was not the biggest barrier to open source adoption. Rather, it was simply unfamiliarity with open source solutions.

Interesting stuff indeed. FOSS is more popular than some people realise here, I suppose.

More interesting

"Number of Survey Respondents in 2011: 455

Number in 2012: 740"

Are you aware of the concept "statistically insignificant"?