@Jason818: Text based languages are visual ... but I digress into philosophical ideas.  Text is more concise, usually, than visual languages because they are symbolic of some mental concept and if you have to draw a rectangle or something to define boundaries,that ends up being extra noise with no syntactical or semantic meaning, and instead, some label on that shape is what is actually important. Because of this, and other reasons, visual languages end up saying very little in a lot of space.  If you imagine a visual language and take away all the things that have no semantic meaning, you'll likely be reduced to text, and some variety of lines or arrows connecting text in various ways.  Then eventually you'll reduce that set of text and lines to what amounts to something like mathematics or Haskell.  Visual programming tools can be used to manipulate text in some ways, or help understand some meaning of a specific subset of code, but it's a real challenge to eliminate noise and end up with something succinct, without ending up with just 1 or 2 dimensional text. There are exceptions.  Obviously, with something like a web page in HTML, viewing the rendered HTML is much more succinct and direct than trying to parse the HTML to understand what it will look like in the end.