, evildictaitor wrote

I think you'll find that Microsoft only listens to constructive feedback. If you say "Using the new start menu has made me less efficient", Microsoft might engage with you.

This is incorrect. General opposition to the removal of the start menu from the desktop app has been about the loss of visual context between the Metroesque full screen start screen and multiple desktop apps when performing ad-hoc, on the fly searching from the desktop or accessing "tier 2 frequency" apps (not frequent enough for taskbar pinning, but frequent enough to be on an MRU) without being blocked from seeing what they're looking at. For example, how would I search for something if I need to reference something I'm looking at in a desktop application while typing my search query? Don't answer -- my point is --

These are the constructive criticisms that have been made for months about the loss of the start menu and all we've heard from Microsoft, the people who work there, the people here, and the Microsoft fan press (Thurott, et. al) is that:

1. People are mad because the actual orb is gone, ignorning the functionality criticism, and suggesting that people use third party apps to put a PICTURE of a button there.

2. Responses like "All I'm hearing is blah blah blah -- I hate change."

3. People who don't feel they should lose visual context of their work while searching are suffering from a mental disorder (no joke -read Thurrott)

People are complaining about the loss of the start menu, and people who like this change are setting up straw man reasons for why people complaining -- and that includes all of those people I mentioned above.