, dahat wrote

 

It's so much fun hearing you spout lies about things you obviously know little about.

I'll tell you a little secret... I was on the HSBS (Home and Small Business Server) team for a bit.

What exactly do you call 'regular Small Business Server'? If you mean the version that came with Exchange & SQL server in the box... those features were removed prior to Office 365 being setup... in fact, the announcement you were hyper-ventilating about was more of a re-branding.

I mean the one with Exchange in the box.

Small Business Server 2011, the last regular release, was RTMed in December 2010 (that means before Office 365)

http://blogs.technet.com/b/yungchou/archive/2010/12/13/windows-small-business-server-sbs-2011-rtm.aspx

Office 365 was launched in June 2011:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microsoft_Office_365

Microsoft announced the discontinuation of the regular SBS version in July 2012:

http://blogs.technet.com/b/sbs/archive/2012/07/05/windows-small-business-server-essentials-becomes-windows-server-2012-essentials.aspx

One year after Office 365 was launched. So, yes, I stand by it: The regular Small Business Server was killed after Office 365 was set-up.

"those features were removed prior to Office 365 being setup"

Obviously not. SBS 2011 was full-featured and was released just six months before the Office 365 launch.

 

, dahat wrote

Have you tried Windows Server 2012 Essentials? I have... it's just like Windows Small Business Server 2011 (which I helped build)... only it runs on Server 2012 and has some additional features (including Office 365) *gasp*!

No, it's not "just like" Small Business Server 2011, since it lacks on-premise Exchange.

 

 

, dahat wrote

Wait... they only really renamed the product?

Transforming an on-premise server to a cloud solution is called renaming nowadays? And you're calling me the troll?!

, dahat wrote

Of course... none of this is new... you've also been screaming about how WPF is dead...

It's definitely on life-support.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-US/

Click on "Windows" there, you get this:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-US/windows/default.aspx

Hm, there is a "Desktop" item, there, you click on it and..

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-US/windows/desktop/

Stll no WPF! But: "Explore the docs about desktop app development ...Check out the Windows Development Reference for in-depth technical information about how to build desktop apps...." you click on it and.. Tada!:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/windows/desktop/hh447209

That's the Win32 documentation! So, the prefered way to write desktop applications is Win32 apparently. According to MSDN at least.

I am not saying WPF is EOL, I am sure WPF applications will continue to run for a long time to come.. but Microsoft's attention level to it is barley above their attention to WinForms.

Let's see how the MSDN frontpage looked like in 2010 (before the "re-imagined" virus):

http://tinyurl.com/d4xvoqt

We click on "Desktop", this leads to:

"Developing desktop applications on Windows

Now that you know what desktop development is, watch this next video to get an overview of the Microsoft tools and technologies for desktop development, and learn about the three programming models: WPF (Windows Presentation Foundation), Silverlight, and C++ (native)."

 

BOOM. WPF mentioned right on the frontpage of the Windows MSDN page.

How about the MSDN quicklinks: http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/default.aspx Not a trace.. (funny that even XNA is mentioned, yet no WPF)

So, WPF got some new features? So did WinForms in 2007.