, PaoloM wrote

*snip*

Wow, talk about revisionist history... forgot how the first TWO releases of OSX couldn't even play a DVD? How the iPhone's app story for a full year was "write a web page"?

Sure, and remember how Windows XP was hacked to hell in back over a decade ago around the same time? 

We can play that game of comparing unsupported, not presently sold, and decades old software all day. As I said in my post, there is a belief that consumers nowadays will accept the same crap that computer geeks accepted over 10 years ago (which is when the products you just mentioned and Windows XP came out). My point is that when you take into account all of the bugs/issues with the current iterations of both OSX, Windows, (and Linux), iPad, Surface, (and Android), and iPhone, Windows Phone, (and Android), the bottom line is that Apple products generally don't need to have additional work done to them by the person who bought it to make them work as advertised or have glaring system level issues that prevent functionality or break during normal use (Windows Update prompting to restart the computer when TrustedInstaller is still in the background still only about half of the way through a patch in the middle of copying files, for example -- yes Windows update still breaks spontaneously, nearly in every case requiring a reinstall because PSS doesn't know what the error codes mean). 

A shitty app in an update? Big deal, that happens to OSX, iOS, Windows, Android, and everything else. Fundamental parts of Windows come out of the box broken, planned to be fixed in a service pack, get fixed in a service pack, and then break again in the exact same ways two entire releases later even though those parts haven't even changed.

Also -- the supported platform of a phone OS at the time of release being web apps is not a bug. And to my point -- that phone worked as advertised, right out of the box.