, evildictaitor wrote

*snip*

Whilst that may be true for some scenarios (like if you do something stupid like allocate space for a pagefile in the RAM disk), for others it will have a beneficial effect. Storing something on a RAM disk means that it never touches the real disk, so a RAM disk might be ideal for storing lots of intermediate files which for some reason must be written out to somewhere - for example if you're taking a photo and passing it through lots of small programs each of which does a transform to the file and then writes it back to disk, then a RAM disk would speed things up just because you avoid all of the file flushes going out to disk.

If you've got lots of spare RAM, chances are the file will exist in the disk cache and won't actually be committed to the physical disk anyway. Windows already does a far better job at caching than you'll get from a RAMdisk.