All I was saying is that XP still has a large installed base. I expect XP will (sadly) stay with us for a couple more years. Many people don't care that much about whether IE9 or Visual Studio 2012 runs on their machine. There are many offices and home users that get along fine with XP and Office 2003 on their old machine. And probably will for the next few years. Surprisingly, even 16% of all Steam users are still on XP (http://store.steampowered.com/hwsurvey?platform=pc, click "Windows Version" in the table).

Let's be realistic here:

  1. Microsoft's decision is understandable.
  2. Microsoft (probably) has no evil motives.
  3. XP is still in use, not just in niche markets and probably will be for the forseeable future.
  4. A fair share of developers have therefore interest in XP compatibility
  5. There are workarounds to the problem