Sep 24, 2012 at 9:03 AM, SimonJ wroteI would have to disagree. It is just about the fastest deveopment tool available for making "forms over data" applications for businesses. A big, all-singing, all-dancing development environment it is not - making it much faster and a lot easier to use PROVIDED you use it for what it was intended.

^^ this. It's not for making 'websites', especially since Silverlight blows on mobile (if it'll run at all) and the HTML Client (still in preview, mind you) doesn't look like it will make up that deficiency. You can jerry-rig it to behave like you want but if you are going to be writing 100's of lines of code, you might as well stick with Forms or MVC or some other non-RAD tooling.

But for simple data-entry (like Simon said, "Forms over Data"), it's an incredible framework. It's a bit of a learning curve due to the application architecture and UI in Visual Studio, but once you get past that, you'll find that Lightswitch has it's niche and isn't dead by any means.

But definitely keep an eye on the HTML Client. Depending on how well the M$ Team builds it out, you might be finding that Lightswitch's little niche market might explode into the 'actual website' sphere.

Now personally, I've developed a few websites with Lightswitch but I've restricted it's usage for 'back-office' and 'web admin panel' functionality only. I then use MVC for the front-end (better UI customization and browser compatibility) and query the Lightswitch tables for anything data-driven. That architecture has worked well for me and I never have to touch SQL since Lightswitch generates the database schema and handles CRUD operations (Think of it as Entity Framework on Easy-Mode). You'll also find that customers like the clean, easy-to-comprehend Lightswitch UI. And when they come back with customizations or new data requirements, you'll see why Lightswitch isn't dead.